FanPost

Buddy Nix's Draft Picks At Combine

I thought it would be kind of fun to piggy back off of Brian's article "Bills have drafted Combine Superstars under Nix". I wasn't sure what we'd find, if anything at all that notes a trend for the Bills drafting under Buddy but if nothing else it's a good place to put all this information for future use and if we feel like it in the future we can just add in this years draft and so on and so forth.

I grabbed all of these numbers from NFL.com so i'm not sure if their official, unofficial, made up, accurate, boring, interesting or any other adjectives you may have. Also note that some players like T.J. Graham ran better at their pro days as opposed to the combine. The good thing is we can grade all of these players on a level playing field because they're all running, benching etc... at the same venue. Save of course Chris Johnson type 40 numbers where the turf at the old Colts stadium was thought to be faster...but that's a different discussion.

First, here's a definition of each of the categories just in case you weren't 100% certain what scouts were looking for when the players did these drills. I copied the info directly from NFL.com so if you want it tweaked or modified or simply don't agree with the verbiage let me know the comments section and i'll adjust if I feel it's warranted.

********** Combine Drill Definitions **********

40-yard dash: The 40-yard dash is the marquee event at the combine. It's kind of like the 100-meters at the Olympics: It's all about speed, explosion and watching skilled athletes run great times. These athletes are timed at 10, 20 and 40-yard intervals. What the scouts are looking for is an explosion from a static start.

Bench press: The bench press is a test of strength -- 225 pounds, as many reps as the athlete can get. What the NFL scouts are also looking for is endurance. Anybody can do a max one time, but what the bench press tells the pro scouts is how often the athlete frequented his college weight room for the last 3-5 years.

Vertical jump: The vertical jump is all about lower-body explosion and power. The athlete stands flat-footed and they measure his reach. It is important to accurately measure the reach, because the differential between the reach and the flag the athlete touches is his vertical jump measurement.


Broad jump: The broad jump is like being in gym class back in junior high school. Basically, it is testing an athlete's lower-body explosion and lower-body strength. The athlete starts out with a stance balanced and then he explodes out as far as he can. It tests explosion and balance, because he has to land without moving.

3 cone drill: The 3 cone drill tests an athlete's ability to change directions at a high speed. Three cones in an L-shape. He starts from the starting line, goes 5 yards to the first cone and back. Then, he turns, runs around the second cone, runs a weave around the third cone, which is the high point of the L, changes directions, comes back around that second cone and finishes.

Shuttle run: The short shuttle is the first of the cone drills. It is known as the 5-10-5. What it tests is the athlete's lateral quickness and explosion in short areas. The athlete starts in the three-point stance, explodse out 5 yards to his right, touches the line, goes back 10 yards to his left, left hand touches the line, pivot, and he turns 5 more yards and finishes.

********** Bills draftee's results under Buddy Nix **********

RD

PLAYER

POS.

40

3 Cone

60 YD shuttle

Bench

20 Yard Shuttle

Vert

Broad

1

Stephon Gilmore

CB

4.4

6.61

11.15

15

3.94

36

123(10.25ft)

2

Cordy Glenn

T

5.15

8.13

31

5

23.5

93(7.75ft)

3

T.J. Graham

WR

4.41

6.77

8

4.18

33.5

120(10 ft)

4

Nigel Bradham

LB

4.64

7.18

24

4.37

37

121

4

Ron Brooks

CB

4.37

12

38

120(10 ft)

5

Zebrie Sanders

T

5.41

8.15

28

4.99

27

100(8.3ft)

5

Tank Carder

LB

4.69

6.89

11.53

19

4.18

34.5

121(10.08ft)

6

Mark Asper

G

23

7

John Potter

K

1

Marcell Dareus

DT

4.93

7.83

24

4.62

27

2

Aaron Williams

DB

4.56

6.72

11.35

18

4.07

37.5

127(10.6ft)

3

Kelvin Sheppard

LB

22

4.28

33.5

110(9.2ft)

4

Da'Norris Searcy

DB

4.56

6.87

11.18

27

4.09

33

120(10ft)

4

Chris Hairston

T

5.43

7.9

33

4.7

29

96(8ft)

5

Johnny White

RB

4.56

7.07

11.62

4.31

32.5

117(9.75ft)

6

Chris White

LB

4.68

6.95

11.85

17

4.25

34

115(9.6ft)

7

Justin Rogers

DB

4.5

7.21

11.4

14

4.2

33

114(9.5ft)

7

Michael Jasper

DT

1

C.J. Spiller

RB

4.37

2

Torell Troup

DT

34

3

Alex Carrington

DE

4

Marcus Easley

WR

4.46

11.5

16

123(10.25ft)

5

Ed Wang

T

29

6

Arthur Moats

OLB

4.66

4.37

36.5

6

Danny Batten

LB

7

Levi Brown

QB

7.07

20

7

Kyle Calloway

G

Best at combine

All

4.24

6.42

10.75

49

3.81

49

11.7ft

I thought it would be good to put the combine records in there as well. Some of those numbers are nasty. I also italicized the players that had no Combine information or weren't participants. The numbers in bold are the high numbers for the Bills players in their respective drills.

Items that interested me

1) When you look at the 2010 draft class there looked to be minor participation. I didn't research to find out why those players didn't participate but if you want to then go for it. In fact 2010 had by far the lowest participation in the drills than the other 2 drafts that Buddy oversaw. Not only that but for all of the players that participated the 2010 had more players miss events than the 2011 and 2012 draft classes combined.

I think the 2010 draft class brings up some interesting points:

1a) First, there are plenty of people that think the 2010 draft class was more of a Modrak driven draft because Buddy didn't have his scouting departments in place and was really going off of what Modrak had put together at that point. In fact some fans think that the 2012 draft was the first true Buddy draft in that he had his scouting departments organized the way he wanted.

1b) I'm sure you've heard/read me say that Buddy drafts prototypes. Part of being able to evaluate a prototype is putting them through tests like the Combine to see how they stack up against their peers. If you think that the 2010 draft was more of a Modrak draft and then add the lack Combine participation to fully evaluate the players against their peers there looks to be something to that. I think Buddy is a height, weight, speed, length, quickness guy and when looking at the severe lack of participation of the 2010 draft class you might be inclined to agree that Buddy wasn't necessarily the architect of the 2010 draft class. He was pulling the trigger, don't get me wrong, but did he get the information he needed to make the right decisions? The Combine looks to be a pretty big part of his scouting process. That's part of his thoroughness and how he can accurately stack some of these guys against their peers.

2) Stephon Gilmore, Cordy Glenn, T.J. Graham, Ron Brooks, Marcell Dareus, Nigel Bradham and C.J. Spiller are all athletic freaks in one way or another. Look at Ron Brooks numbers (4.37, 38 vert, 10ft broad). Jumps right off the board.

3) When you're doing your mock drafts, look the Combine numbers if you want to get an indication of a guy Buddy might take. If you have 2 prospects that are close in grades go take a look the Combine numbers. If one guy is more of an athletic freak then Buddy probably would take that one over the other. At least IMO.

Closing Thoughts

This isn't the end all be all of player evaluation under Buddy but it does give us some insight into Buddy's drafting philosophy. I don't want you to think that Buddy uses the Combine above everything else but you can certainly see that he values the Combine and the information it gives him and his scouts. If nothing else I think under Buddy we have a traditional front office in that you watch guys on film and then if something sticks out at the Combine you investigate that further. Which should lead to better drafting of players. The more information the better.

I'm really interested in your thoughts on the 2010 draft class and their lack of participation. Is it an anomaly? Is there reason to believe that Buddy was following Modraks model that year?

Take a look at the numbers and let me know if anything sticks out to you. Are there any trends you notice? Is there any information we can use to try and do mock drafts in the future?

One thing is for sure, when looking at the 2012/2011 draft classes at the Combine it is certainly a big part of Buddy's evaluation on potential players he's going to draft. As a result, I encourage you to take Combine numbers into consideration when mock drafting Bills players under Buddy Nix.

Just another great fan opinion shared on the pages of BuffaloRumblings.com.

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