FanPost

2014 Senior Bowl Practices: A Collection of Spectator Notes

And so I have finished collecting the notes from the 2014 Senior Bowl. This was a very time consuming task and I'm not sure it was even worth it. I guess that's up to the rest of you if you sort through this mess. I originally wanted to have at least 5 worthy notes on each player listed, but with 20,000 words already, I've had enough.

I did not create a list before compiling these notes. I let the notes dictate who was listed here. If someone didn't stand out in a positive or negative way, there was obviously not much written about them, and therefore not any material to be included. I hope it gives you guys some more insight into some of these guys.

QB

Tajh Boyd

  • I feel for the wide receivers on the North team due to the inconsistency from all three quarterbacks on the roster. Miami QB Stephen Morris, Virginia Tech QB Logan Thomas and Clemson QB Tajh Boyd were all inconsistent on day one, which was almost expected after the up-and-down senior seasons of all three. Boyd in particular struggled with accuracy and his ball placement is a strong concern. Thomas threw a few pretty passes that hit receivers between the numbers, but other fastballs hit the ground or sailed over his intended target. The good news for this group? The only place to go from here is up. (January 20, 2014) Source
  • Boyd continues to be unimpressive, largely because of his accuracy issues. He slings the ball from wild arm angles and sometimes the ball would arrive on time and hit the receiver in the hands, but there were too many other passes that were off the mark and really caused the intended target to do most of the work. (January 21, 2014) Source
  • If you isolated Tuesday's highlight throws from Thomas, Boyd and Morris, you would have three potential first round picks. But once you add the negative passes and lowlights from the practice, you're left with three physically gifted players who are wildly inconsistent throwing the football. There is still work to be done on these players, but it's hard not to be discouraged by this week's results so far. (January 21, 2014) Source
  • The three quarterbacks on the North team – Tajh Boyd, Stephen Morris and Logan Thomas – had a real chance to improve their draft stock this week and didn't. Of the three, Thomas remains the most intriguing because of his physical upside. But he'll have to get paired with a good coaching staff to make the most of his natural talent. (January 24, 2014) Source
  • Despite media reports to the contrary, Boyd's inaccuracy throughout the week of practice and game itself has his stock slipping. He possesses plenty of arm strength but was erratic, spraying the ball over the field. An ugly interception early in the Senior Bowl set the tone for a disappointing performance from the North Team's offense, as a whole. (January 25, 2014) Source

Derek Carr

  • A possible first round pick, Carr has elite velocity as a passer and can make every throw on the football field. He needs to improve his pocket tolerance and mechanics, but Carr has the mobility, arm strength and football instincts that makes him an appealing prospect. He should shine in Mobile. (January 19, 2014) Source

  • Of the South's quarterbacks, Fresno State's Derek Carr unquestionably possesses the best arm. The ball explodes out of his hand and caught a few of his new teammates by surprise with how quickly it got to them. Carr showed good anticipation, often delivering passes before his receivers turned back to look for the ball. (January 20, 2014) Source
  • Finally, Derek Carr of Fresno State showcased his big arm today, along with consistently high and tight mechanics that allow him to control his velocity well. Still raw laterally and in his drop back steps, and his overall body positioning on the move needs work, but it’s clear he has all the tools to work with. (January 20, 2014) Source
  • The South's best quarterback on Monday was clearly Derek Carr of Fresno State. He was getting the ball out quickly and throwing with good velocity. On one play, Carr rolled out to his right and effortlessly hit his target on the move. (January 20, 2014) Source
  • Derek Carr’s velocity, especially in the gusty wind, was once again impressive. When it comes to arm strength, he really has no competition on among the South QB contingent. Carr also looked very athletic in an escape drill in which quarterbacks must drop back and spin out of trouble before rolling out and hitting a 12-yard out on the move. His habit of dropping his back shoulder and fading away, however, was magnified in this drill. His accuracy inconsistencies stem from these types of mechanical issues that have plagued him for much of his college career. (January 21, 2014) Source
  • On the South team, quarterback Derek Carr hasn't done quite enough to secure a spot in the first round, but he's getting there. Carr was on point again Tuesday, and showed he could target all points of the field. More impressively, Carr showed off his work ethic. He and Vanderbilt wide receiver Jordan Matthews worked together after Monday's practices. On Tuesday, it was Carr and Matthews were joined by BYU wide receiver Cody Hoffman and Texas' Mike Davis for 20 minutes after practice concluded. (January 21, 2014) Source
  • Of the three South quarterbacks – Derek Carr, David Fales and Jimmy Garappolo – Carr is a considerable cut above. On Thursday he showed good anticipation and ball placement. He put routinely put the ball only where his receiver could high point it in the end zone. On one play Carr improvised and worked past his first option earning the praise of Jaguars offensive coordinator Jedd Fisch. (January 23, 2014) Source
  • No quarterback in Mobile was as good as Carr, and it's not even all that close. Throughout the week Carr was throwing accurate passes into tight spots. If there were any questions about Carr's arm strength, he answered them. Even in high winds during Tuesday's practice, Carr was effortlessly delivering the ball. The issue with Carr will continue to be how he plays in the face of pressure. This setting didn't test that often. It is worth noting, though, that in Thursday's walk through, Carr was pressured on the last two plays of the day and he looked flustered. (January 24, 2014) Source

David Fales

  • San Jose State quarterback David Fales is more of a gamer than a practice-guy but his lack of ideal arm-strength, unfortunately, stood out in comparison to Carr and, to a lesser-extent, Garoppolo. Fales telegraphed some throws (including a short pass over the middle that was intercepted by LSU linebacker Lamin Barrow) and his passes to the perimeter had too much air under them. (January 19, 2014) Source
  • Each quarterback showed a bit of what makes them a potential Top 100 pick during the day, but none stepped up as the clear cut top passer from the group. One of the biggest takeaway’s from the group, however, is the clear step down in velocity that David Fales of San Jose State has. He was very quick in footwork and drop back drills, taking controlled, balanced steps and staying tight on rollouts. But the noticeable difference in velocity is what may push him behind the other two passers. (January 20, 2014) Source
  • David Fales had quite the challenge as the wind affected his accuracy a bit more than the other quarterbacks. Fales is an above average athlete but next to Carr and Garoppolo, he moves noticeably slower in everything he does. Much credit goes to Fales for competing this week, but it’s not exactly an ideal set up for a guy whose timing, touch and anticipation are his best throwing qualities. (January 21, 2014) Source
  • San Jose State's David Fales enjoyed his strongest performance of the week. Carr and Garoppolo seemed to play it safe Wednesday, frequently taking check-downs and rarely risking dangerous throws. Garoppolo, for example, elected to throw an intermediate sideline route out of bounds rather than attack deep down the middle to an open receiver on a surprise flea-flicker midway through practice. Adding to his reputation as a "gamer," Fales kept his eyes downfield, rifling a few well-thrown intermediate and deep passes, including one particularly well-thrown pass to Colorado State tight end Crockett Gillmore after escaping the rush and rolling to his right. (January 22, 2014) Source
  • Of the three South quarterbacks – Derek Carr, David Fales and Jimmy Garappolo – Carr is a considerable cut above... Fales had some nice passes but he often holds the ball too long. (January 23, 2014) Source
  • David Fales of San Jose State looks like a quarterback who will have to be in the right system to succeed. He just doesn't have the arm strength to make all of the difficult throws he'll have to in the NFL. (January 24, 2014) Source

Jimmy Garoppolo

  • After a record-breaking career at the FCS-level, Garoppolo impressed NFL teams last week at the East-West Shrine Game and will look to do the same this week in Mobile. He doesn't have a cannon for an arm, but his eye use, quick release and intellectual process is top shelf. (January 19, 2014) Source
  • Eastern Illinois quarterback Jimmy Garoppolo continued the positive momentum he'd gained from the East-West Shrine Game with an impressive initial practice. While he does not possess Carr's howitzer, Garoppolo has a very quick set-up and release and frequently threw led his receivers away from defenders, showing better ball-placement than Carr on several of his throws. (January 19, 2014) Source
  • Jimmy Garoppolo didn’t get the opportunity to thrive during the Shrine Game practices last week, but his quick release was on display on day one in Mobile. While his rollouts and drop back seteps need work, he has plus velocity across the field, and his quick release allowed for his throws to reach his receiver faster than Derek Carr, despite the drop in arm strength. (January 20, 2014) Source
  • Of the three South quarterbacks – Derek Carr, David Fales and Jimmy Garappolo – Carr is a considerable cut above... Garappolo was decent but sporadic at times. (January 23, 2014) Source
  • Jimmy Garoppolo of Eastern Illinois had himself a fine week as well. Everything said about him at the Shrine Game – quick release, athletic, smart with the football – was true in Mobile. He doesn't have an overly strong arm, but it's good enough. The second or third round talk with Garoppolo is real. (January 24, 2014) Source
  • First off, his quick release, strong arm, leadership ability and football intelligence are the three characteristics I think make him a top 100 pick, maybe even a high second rounder. During the two all-star game events, he showed he can make "all the throws", and that he's a quick learner in terms of NFL style progressions. His small-ish hands are a bit of an issue, and his footwork needs a LOT of work, in all areas. (February 5, 2014) Source

Stephen Morris

  • Morris has effortless arm strength to deliver the ball anywhere on the field, but his decision making and accuracy are both questionable, causing him to struggle much of 2013. He has enough size and athleticism, but his consistency as a passer leaves a lot to be desired. (January 19, 2014) Source
  • I feel for the wide receivers on the North team due to the inconsistency from all three quarterbacks on the roster. Miami QB Stephen Morris, Virginia Tech QB Logan Thomas and Clemson QB Tajh Boyd were all inconsistent on day one, which was almost expected after the up-and-down senior seasons of all three. Boyd in particular struggled with accuracy and his ball placement is a strong concern. Thomas threw a few pretty passes that hit receivers between the numbers, but other fastballs hit the ground or sailed over his intended target. The good news for this group? The only place to go from here is up. (January 20, 2014) Source
  • Morris showed improvements from Monday's practice with better all-around accuracy. He appeared to be taking a little bit off his fastball, which allowed him to better control the placement of the throw. Morris' delivery and arm strength appear effortless and easy, but he still struggled with errant passes and inconsistent throws. (January 21, 2014) Source
  • If you isolated Tuesday's highlight throws from Thomas, Boyd and Morris, you would have three potential first round picks. But once you add the negative passes and lowlights from the practice, you're left with three physically gifted players who are wildly inconsistent throwing the football. There is still work to be done on these players, but it's hard not to be discouraged by this week's results so far. (January 21, 2014) Source
  • The three quarterbacks on the North team – Tajh Boyd, Stephen Morris and Logan Thomas – had a real chance to improve their draft stock this week and didn't. Of the three, Thomas remains the most intriguing because of his physical upside. But he'll have to get paired with a good coaching staff to make the most of his natural talent. (January 24, 2014) Source
  • Morris earned the nickname "Tin Cup" from some scouts at the Senior Bowl due to his ability to make the amazing throw but struggles with the routine passes commonplace in every NFL offense. Morris boasts a strong arm and throws the deep ball with touch, but like the other two quarterbacks on the North squad (Boyd and Virginia Tech's Logan Thomas), he struggled with accuracy throughout the week. (January 25, 2014) Source

Logan Thomas

  • I feel for the wide receivers on the North team due to the inconsistency from all three quarterbacks on the roster. Miami QB Stephen Morris, Virginia Tech QB Logan Thomas and Clemson QB Tajh Boyd were all inconsistent on day one, which was almost expected after the up-and-down senior seasons of all three. Boyd in particular struggled with accuracy and his ball placement is a strong concern. Thomas threw a few pretty passes that hit receivers between the numbers, but other fastballs hit the ground or sailed over his intended target. The good news for this group? The only place to go from here is up. (January 20, 2014) Source
  • Thomas is the most physically gifted quarterback, not only in Mobile this week, but in the entire class with his tall, well-proportioned frame and big arm to toss the ball anywhere he wants on the field. But touch continues to be an issue with him. During Tuesday's practice, Thomas would throw a perfect laser that hit his intended target s between the numbers, but then would follow it up with an overthrow that sailed well over the receivers head and another errant pass that caused the wideout to re-route in order to try and track down the throw. (January 21, 2014) Source

  • We'll often hear this draft season that Thomas has "what can't be taught" when referring to his physical attributes, but can touch and accuracy be taught? It can be tweaked and improved from a mechanical standpoint, but from his performances the past two days along with three years of game film, it's tough to see the upside with Thomas. It wouldn't surprise me if the Virginia Tech quarterback ends up hearing his name called on the second day of the draft. But a team that drafts him that high is living on a hope and a prayer – similar to many of Thomas' throws this week. (January 21, 2014) Source

  • If you isolated Tuesday's highlight throws from Thomas, Boyd and Morris, you would have three potential first round picks. But once you add the negative passes and lowlights from the practice, you're left with three physically gifted players who are wildly inconsistent throwing the football. There is still work to be done on these players, but it's hard not to be discouraged by this week's results so far. (January 21, 2014) Source
  • After practices, Thomas told me that he's raw as a quarterback, despite being a multi-year starter at Virginia Tech. Thomas is working with quarterback coach George Whitfield to improve his front leg in hopes that it boosts his accuracy. (January 21, 2014) Source
  • The three quarterbacks on the North team – Tajh Boyd, Stephen Morris and Logan Thomas – had a real chance to improve their draft stock this week and didn't. Of the three, Thomas remains the most intriguing because of his physical upside. But he'll have to get paired with a good coaching staff to make the most of his natural talent. (January 24, 2014) Source
  • Even though people have already said it, I think Logan Thomas needs a LOT of work. He told me that he and George Whitfield are working on fixing his front foot position to better his placement, but I think it's a lot more than that. Still, some team will grab him in the 3rd round. (February 5, 2014) Source

RB

Antonio Andrews

  • One of the biggest winners of the day regardless of position was Antonio Andrews of Western Kentucky, especially as a receiver. A thick lower half combined with quickness as a route runner to separate and footwork to adjust after the catch, he was the recipient of praise throughout practice by the coaching staff. (January 20, 2014) Source
  • Keep an eye on Western Kentucky’s Antonio Andrews as a back who could have an early impact on an NFL team. He was easily the best back from both squads during blitz pickup drills, showing the strength to absorb contact and ride defenders away from the quarterback. He caught the ball well again today and showed patience and burst in the team session. The Hilltopper does all the little things but he must continue to prove that he’s beyond the fumbling issues he had in college. (January 21, 2014) Source
  • The shorter (and thicker) Antonio Andrews flashed in blitz pickup with the ability to anchor and win initially with his stout build. Issues came when defenders countered quickly after first contact. Andrews needs to keep his feet moving and work on resetting his anchor to maintain balance in these situations. (January 22, 2014) Source
  • Paired with great patience, it was evident that Andrews received good coaching at Western Kentucky. When the defense was in an over front, Andrews read the three-technique to determine whether or not he should push strong-side runs into the A-gap (between the center and guard) or if he should push it out to the C-gap (between the tackle and tight end). He also showed an uncanny ability to see, or feel, the backside cutback lanes open up and on occasion bounce outside if the defensive end lost contain. (January 24, 2014) Source

  • For my money, Andrews was the best back in Mobile. He lost two inches in the weigh-in but gained 10lbs and looked great. Andrews has the huge thighs and overall strength to be a good back, which he has shown on tape. Where Andrews was surprising was how well he caught the football and he was a revelation as a blocker. The Hilltoppers simply did not use him as a conventional blocker much and everything was the extension of play action, but he was among the best in pass protection. He also showed soft hands. (January 27, 2014) Source

David Fluellen

  • Fluellen eclipsed the 1,000 yard rushing mark in 2013, but he also battled several injuries that kept him on the sidelines part of the season. An above average pass-catcher, the MAC runner is tough and reliable with the ball in his hands, but he also lacks the athletic traits to separate him from others. (January 19, 2014) Source

Charles Sims

  • With Carlos Hyde dropping out, Sims steps up as the top running back prospect in Mobile this week. He is a tough, one-cut runner who stays upright through contact with his combination of natural balance and power. The Houston transfer is also very reliable catching the ball out of the backfield. (January 19, 2014) Source
  • Charles Sims continued to excel as a pass catcher, showing the soft hands and radius to extend and adjust in the flat areas. He’s well prepared to handle third down duties as a pass protector as well, but needs to keep his feet moving to absorb and control his opponent with more effectiveness. Overall he was the best in blitz pickup drills and continues to impress with his smooth running style. (January 22, 2014) Source
  • Sims entered Senior Bowl week as the best running back and he leaves in the same spot. He is a cut above just about every running back in the draft this year in regard to his pass catching and blocking. At the Senior Bowl he showed elusiveness and a nice initial burst after his cut move. (January 24, 2014) Source

Lorenzo Taliaferro

  • Coastal Carolina back Lorenzo Taliaferro led the North running backs during blitz pickup drills with patient feet to slide into position, stay square and absorb contact. As a runner, he displayed the ability to dip his shoulders and avoid contact through the hole. On multiple occasions, he also correctly read the front seven’s over-pursuit and promptly cut to the backside on zone running plays. (January 22, 2014) Source
  • Taliaferro definitely looks the part and he was simply dominating as a pass blocker. He was must see when it came to that part of practice, shutting opponents down with a great punch and making it look easy. I have not watched him on tape, but I am definitely looking forward to seeing it. (January 27, 2014) Source

James White

  • After waiting his turn behind Montee Ball, White shouldered a heavier load in 2013, despite sharing carries with the more talented Melvin Gordon. He has a lean frame and will probably never get above 200 pounds, but he runs tough, physical and has exceeded expectations. (January 19, 2014) Source

WR

Jared Abbrederis

  • A former walk-on, Abbrederis is a balanced athlete with gliding speed and short-area quickness to create separation in coverage. Although he's not the biggest or fastest, he is a savvy route runner and reliable hands-catcher who projects as a dependable NFL target. (January 19, 2014) Source
  • Speaking of the wide receivers, I really like the group on the North team. The South squad might have the only senior wideout who ends up being drafted in the top-50 picks (Jordan Matthews), but the mid-round talent at receiver on the North is above average. Wisconsin WR Jared Abbrederis, Wyoming WR Robert Herron and Oregon WR Josh Huff all looked good on Monday before, after and during the catch. All three have a legitimate chance to be drafted in the top-100 and Monday reminded everyone why. (January 20, 2014) Source
  • Jared Abbrederis of Wisconsin is such a technician as a route runner, and he works so well to get cornerbacks outside the framework of their body as he sets up deep breaking routes. He’s finished his routes and seems focused throughout his route tree on every play. Throughout the week, he’s been arguably the top receiver in attendance at the Senior Bowl. (January 22, 2014) Source
  • He may not have the fastest 40-yard dash time of the bunch, but without much wasted motion, Abbrederis’ routes are efficient and extremely difficult for defensive backs to read. If a defensive back is undisciplined with his eyes and gets caught peeking at the quarterback, the 6-foot, 189-pound Badger will make him look silly. I watched him run one route that was a double move, and he actually made the defensive back spin around twice. This guy was impressive all season in the Big Ten, and he was consistent in Mobile. (January 24, 2014) Source

Kain Colter

  • Northwestern's former quarterback transitioned smoothly to wide receiver this week – especially if you compare him to what Denard Robinson a year ago. Colter was running crisp routes and craftily getting open in short areas. Unfortunately, Colter will be undergoing ankle surgery and dropped out of Saturday's game. (January 24, 2014) Source

Mike Davis

  • In fact, it was Davis who stood out the most among the South's receivers. That's saying something considering the group also features Vanderbilt's Jordan Matthews and BYU's Cody Hoffman. Davis was deliberate in his moves, quick and sharp in his cuts. He wasn't beating the jam as well as Matthews, but he looks like a better athlete. (January 20, 2014) Source
  • Former Texas Longhorn Mike Davis had a bit of a streaky practice, burning cornerback Chris Davis on a double move "sluggo" pattern—and then dropping a simple out pattern. He’s not bothered by contact early at the line of scrimmage and arguably was the best receiver against press looks. Still, even when he’s won at the line, cornerbacks are able to recover at the route break due to his inability to plant and redirect explosively at the top of his pass patterns. (January 21, 2014) Source
  • Entering the week of practice, Vanderbilt's Jordan Matthews was receiving plenty of praise for his polish but Texas' Mike Davis has proven just as reliable as a route-runner and hand-catcher throughout the week. The 6-foot (and 3/8), 193-pound Davis' value is increased because of his sure hands and burst as a returner. (January 22, 2014) Source
  • Mike Davis of Texas continued his excellent week of play on Wednesday. He's not the biggest name wide receiver on the South team, but Davis runs the best routes and has the quickest feet. Some team may get a steal on Davis late on the second day of the draft. (January 22, 2014) Source
  • Conversely, Texas' Mike Davis had probably his worst practice of the week. He dropped a couple passes and couldn't stick in bounds on another throw. Still, Davis put together a good week of practices showing off his quickness and athleticism. (January 23, 2014) Source
  • Davis does not lack in natural ability, and he showed it every day of practice. He was cutting quicker than the other receivers on the South team and runs tight, crisp routes. Davis looked more varied in his route running than he often did at Texas. He did in Mobile what every player should try to do. The lone question that Davis left was his hands. On Thursday he dropped a couple easy catches, and that stands out. (January 24, 2014) Source

Cody Hoffman

  • After recording 100 catches last year, Hoffman's production dropped in 2013 (57/894/5) as he battled injuries and inconsistencies. He has a tall, lean frame and will be too easily out-muscled by defensive backs and knocked off his route. Hoffman needs a strong week in Mobile. (January 19, 2014) Source
  • BYU's Cody Hoffman had a nice day as well, doing many of the same things Matthews did. (January 23, 2014) Source
  • Hoffman was a player, who in my view, took full advantage of the experience in Mobile. He looked smoother and more fluid in routes, able to look the part against the rest of the group. His outright speed and burst are questions but he uses his body well and knows how to get open and catch the football. Was an 1/8th of an inch short of 6’4" and looked impressive at 218lbs. (January 27, 2014) Source

Ryan Grant

  • Ryan Grant had the best overall day of the South receivers despite a couple of drops. He consistently separated at the top of his routes and was quick to flip his head to gain yards after the catch. (January 20, 2014) Source
  • Tulane’s Ryan Grant also had difficulty getting by the press coverage during practice. However, he ran routes with outstanding body lean and a low center of gravity to transition cleanly out of breaks. His hands were the softest of the South group, snatching receptions away from his frame. He’ll need to improve at the line of scrimmage but Grant appears ready to contribute out of the slot for NFL teams. (January 21, 2014) Source
  • Tulane’s Ryan Grant is as consistent of a hands-catcher as you’ll find in the college ranks, and he’s shown that this week. Finishing a finger-tip grab from Jimmy Garoppolo after he quickly moved past Lavelle Westbrooks of Georgia Southern, Grant had the biggest play of any receiver during practice. (January 22, 2014) Source
  • Tulane wide receiver Ryan Grant closed the week out nicely on Thursday showing he could out-leap defensive backs to make difficult grabs. (January 24, 2014) Source
  • At a rock-solid 6-foot-0, 197 pounds, Grant showed surprising burst, as well as the agility as a route-runner and reliable hands to out-play several more highly-touted pass catchers. A long touchdown during Wednesday's practice drew plenty of praise from scouts. (January 25, 2014) Source

Robert Herron

  • Speaking of the wide receivers, I really like the group on the North team. The South squad might have the only senior wideout who ends up being drafted in the top-50 picks (Jordan Matthews), but the mid-round talent at receiver on the North is above average. Wisconsin WR Jared Abbrederis, Wyoming WR Robert Herron and Oregon WR Josh Huff all looked good on Monday before, after and during the catch. All three have a legitimate chance to be drafted in the top-100 and Monday reminded everyone why. (January 20, 2014) Source
  • The only receiver to give Lawson trouble was Wyoming's Robert Herron. Though it should be said that Herron was giving every defensive back he went against problems. No receiver on the North team has the quick-cut ability Herron does. He was consistently creating separation on comebacks and has the speed to beat defensive backs over the top. If only a word can be used to describe Herron, it would be slippery. Northwestern quarterback-turned-wide receiver Kain Colter looks natural in his transition. (January 21, 2014) Source
  • Battling for the top receiver of the day was Wyoming’s Robert Herron. He’s quick throughout his route tree, flips his head around with tremendous snap back to the quarterback, and is smooth at the top of his route in attacking the ball. He also get of press remarkably well today for a small receiver, even though he likely won’t be asked to do that much in the NFL as a slot receiver. (January 22, 2014) Source
  • Frankly, while Huff made some splashy plays, more consistency was shown from Herron and even Northwestern's Kain Colter, who is making the transition to receiver after starring as an option quarterback with the Wildcats. While perhaps best known for his straight-line speed, Herron has impressed scouts with his stout frame, competitiveness and willingness to extend for the contested grab. He made the catch of the day early in practice, soaring high to snatch a high, hard pass from Boyd along the left sideline. While clearly a work in progress as a route-runner, Colter (5-foot-11, 199 pounds) has the agility and balance to generate separation and caught the ball cleanly. (January 22, 2014) Source
  • There was no receiver in Mobile craftier than Herron. In drills and full team practices he showed quick feet to get open and speed to beat defensive backs over the top. Herron will get knocked because of his size (just under 5-foot-9) but looks and plays just like Marvin Jones of the Cincinnati Bengals. (January 24, 2014) Source
  • Only 5-8 and 193 pounds, Herron may be part feline. That kid is as quick as a cat. He made corners whiff on several occasions as they tried to jam him off the line of scrimmage while in press coverage. When defenders were in the off position, his cuts in and out of breaks on routes were sharp and sudden. Herron will make a solid slot receiver in the NFL. (January 24, 2014) Source

Josh Huff

  • Speaking of the wide receivers, I really like the group on the North team. The South squad might have the only senior wideout who ends up being drafted in the top-50 picks (Jordan Matthews), but the mid-round talent at receiver on the North is above average. Wisconsin WR Jared Abbrederis, Wyoming WR Robert Herron and Oregon WR Josh Huff all looked good on Monday before, after and during the catch. All three have a legitimate chance to be drafted in the top-100 and Monday reminded everyone why. (January 20, 2014) Source
  • Oregon wideout Josh Huff might be the gifted of the North's receivers but he showed the same frustrating struggles with consistency which characterized his career with the Ducks. Possessing broad-shoulders, strength and toughness, Huff is capable of fighting through safeties to gain position, as well as the quickness and speed to separate from cornerbacks. Unfortunately, the tendency to lose focus on the details - like exploding through his routes or securing the football through the entire catch process - again came into play during Wednesday's practice. Huff can make the spectacular play, demonstrating the ability to track the ball over his shoulder on vertical routes as well as twirling to make acrobatic catches against tight coverage. He also dropped a beautiful deep ball down late in practice down the right sideline and too often was knocked off his feet by aggressive cornerbacks. (January 22, 2014) Source
  • Of the receivers, Josh Huff of Oregon had the best day of the bunch. While he still struggles a bit with press coverage, and did so today, he plays with plus physicality down the field, especially in the red zone fade. He finished at the catch point very well today, and used his hands to separate (legally) against all types of cornerbacks. (January 22, 2014) Source
  • If Herron's speed is worth noting, so is Oregon's Josh Huff. He looked like the fastest wide receiver in Mobile. He should find a spot as a vertical receiver and special teams player in the NFL. (January 24, 2014) Source
  • Huff may be the most fluid athlete at the Senior Bowl. He shakes past, slips around and jumps over defenders, spinning, twisting and dashing with ease. While Mike Davis of Texas, Jordan Matthews of Vanderbilt and several other receivers stood out, I talked to several scouts who thought Huff was the most impressive of the bunch. The only knock I saw on Huff was his tendency to catch the ball with his body. He does not have to -- he showed he can catch the ball away from his body – and it is certainly a bad habit he will have to break at the next level. (January 24, 2014) Source

Jordan Matthews

  • A very productive target, Matthews is an impressive prospect because of his athleticism, catching radius and determination with the ball in his hands. With a combined 201 receptions the past two seasons, he is a detailed and reliable route runner who takes pride in his finishing ability. (January 19, 2014) Source
  • Jordan Matthews of Vanderbilt displayed the softest hands of the South receivers excluding a couple of drops, which seemed to plague all the receivers in the group. However, he really struggled versus physical coverage and doesn’t seem to have the functional strength to fight through it at the NFL level. (January 20, 2014) Source
  • Considering his success in the SEC, perhaps it isn't surprising that Matthews looked the part of a future high NFL pick. Some of the conference's biggest names weren't nearly as well-built as the Commodores' star receiver, who sported a chiseled 6-2 (and 5/8-inch), 209-pound frame, long arms (32 5/8 inches) and big hands (10½ inches). (January 20, 2014) Source
  • Alabama wide receiver Kevin Norwood struggled in the drills. He was getting jammed at the line of scrimmage and was too slow to get his head around to locate the ball. (January 20, 2014) Source
  • Former SEC standout Jordan Matthews had a rough day at the line of scrimmage, struggling to fight through press looks. Matthews is an extremely coachable player, but his lack of burst off the line of scrimmage hurt the timing of routes and allowed defensive backs to stay in the lurch. More overachiever than I expected coming into the event, Matthews finished every reception by running to the end zone. As a route runner, his pad level, footwork and body control out of the break were impressive, but Matthews is more of a backup receiver at the NFL level. (January 21, 2014) Source
  • Vanderbilt wide receiver Jordan Matthews looked more like himself on Thursday than the rest of the week. He was attacking the ball while it was in the air, often skying over cornerbacks. That's where Matthews is at his best, but he didn't show it often enough earlier in the week. (January 23, 2014) Source
  • Matthews' production in the SEC speaks for itself, but he dropped a handful of passes throughout the week of practice. Even more alarming, he showed little in terms of burst or straight-line speed, struggling to gain separation from opposing cornerbacks. (January 25, 2014) Source

Kevin Norwood

  • Alabama native Kevin Norwood won’t be able to play outside right away in the NFL, but he’s clearly a gifted athlete with size, speed and leaping ability. Although he remains raw, his physical tools make him worth drafting and developing. (January 21, 2014) Source
  • Alabama's Kevin Norwood had a nice finish to the week after getting chewed out pretty good by Jaguars wide receivers coach Jerry Sullivan on Monday. Norwood routinely caught the ball and could go up and get contested catches. (January 24, 2014) Source

Jalen Saunders

  • While Ford played well, his former Auburn teammates, Chris Davis, struggled a bit fielding punts early in the practice. Davis has a tendency to allow the ball to hit his chest plate, which results in some double-clutching. Oklahoma's Jalen Saunders also struggled in this area. The former Sooners' star also dropped a couple of passes. (January 19, 2014) Source
  • It is a big man's game and to the surprise of no one, Saunders came in the smallest of any player at this year's Senior Bowl. Saunders came in just under 5-9 (officially 5-8¾) and 164 pounds. He also has small hands (8¾ inches) and short arms (28 7/8 inches). (January 20, 2014) Source

TE

C.J. Fiedorowicz

  • A well-built target, Fiedorowicz headlines an underwhelming group of senior tight ends. His production at Iowa is average at-best, but he was underutilized in the Hawkeyes offense. Fiedorowicz has the size and skill-set to start at the next level and be successful blocking and receiving. (January 19, 2014) Source
  • At tight end, I though CJ Fiedorowicz of Iowa was clearly the best of the bunch, and his size, fluidity as a receiver from the tight end position in the short area, and body positioning in both pass catching and run blocking sets was impressive. He’s a polished tight end who may not have the elite athleticism to go in the Top 50, but he looks the part of a long-term tight end in the NFL. (January 22, 2014) Source
  • Iowa tight end C.J. Fiedorowicz certainly looks the part, but he had issues this week dropping the ball. (January 24, 2014) Source

Crockett Gilmore

  • One of the replacement players to come in was Colorado State tight end Crockett Gilmore, who replaced the injured Marcel Jensen. In his first day of practice, Gilmore showed off good hands and solid route running. Gilmore isn't going to test well – he's a lumbering, build up speed runner. But for a team looking for a dependable No. 2 tight end who can block and do just enough in the passing game, Gilmore will be a nice Day 3 pick. (January 22, 2014) Source
  • New addition Crockett Gilmore of Colorado State (former Shrine Game player) was very impressive as a blocker, driving Adrian Hubbard to the ground a handful of times and dominating as a run blocker all practice. Coaches seem very impressed with him throughout practice, and he’s quickly made a name for himself after just one day. (January 22, 2014) Source
  • Crockett doesn't always target the ball at the high point, but after one catch over Vanderbilt's Kenny Ladler he emphatically dunked the football over the back of the goalpost, delighting Jaguars coaches. (January 23, 2014) Source
  • Coming down late as an injury replacement, Colorado State tight end Crockett Gilmore helped himself considerably. He's not a fast player. He plods up the field and builds up speed. But he has soft hands, and he made several difficult catches. As a blocker, he's nearly at Lynch's level. (January 24, 2014) Source
  • Gilmore came in late to the Senior Bowl as an injury replacement, but the former defensive end impressed scouts immediately with his size and overall athleticism. He really caught fire during Thursday's practice, extending to haul in an impressive touchdown and continued his stellar play in the game itself. (January 25, 2014) Source

Marcel Jensen

  • Despite Fresno State's pass-happy offense led by Derek Carr, Jensen wasn't a substantial part of the Bulldogs' offense. He wasn't asked to be a consistent blocker and has an average skill-set as a receiver, similar to former South Carolina tight end Justice Cunningham. (January 19, 2014) Source

Arthur Lynch

  • Arthur Lynch of Georgia had an impressive showing Monday as he lined up from a variety of spots on the field including the backfield as an H-back receiver. He’s a hands catcher with some "snatch and go" receiving ability and made tough grabs in traffic. (January 20, 2014) Source
  • One of the stars of the day for the South was Georgia tight end Arthur Lynch. He doesn't blow you away in pass-catching situations, but he was stellar as a blocker Tuesday. (January 21, 2014) Source
  • The same can be said for Georgia's Arthur Lynch. He had another strong showing in blocking drills Wednesday and looked better on receiver plays. The Jaguars coaches were running a much more aggressive practice on Wednesday, and that suits Lynch's style. He was strong coming off the line of scrimmage, jolting a safety and creating separation underneath. On one play Lynch pushed Van Noy out of the way to get open. Lynch will have to improve his ball handling. He doesn't always carry it high and Jones knocked the ball free on one play. (January 22, 2014) Source
  • Arthur Lynch of Georgia is simply too slow to be an effective receiver based on drills during this week. A solid blocker in drills and an efficient hands catcher in space, Lynch simply couldn’t get consistent separation quick enough to win the seam in the NFL. He’ll need to answer those questions at the NFL Combine in a big way. (January 22, 2014) Source
  • Today's practice was all about the matchups between receivers and defensive backs. Georgia tight end Arthur Lynch continued his strong week of practice. He made several contested catches and was physically outmatching the defensive backs he went against. (January 23, 2014) Source
  • No single player helped himself more this week than Lynch. He started the week looking excellent in blocking drills. He finished things out by catching almost everything thrown his direction. Lynch is a physical tight end with enough athleticism to go up and high point the ball over safeties. Lynch isn't a dynamic tight end, but in the third or fourth round he'll be a nice draft choice. (January 24, 2014) Source

OL

Kadeem Edwards

  • Scouts love linemen with long arms and Edwards has the longest of any of the athletes measured Monday at the Senior Bowl, measuring in at 34½ inches. The 6-4 1/8, Edwards also showed good weight distribution with a relatively trim middle at 308 pounds. (January 20, 2014) Source

Jon Halapio

  • The best of the bunch was Florida OG Jon Halapio, who was the only lineman to slow Daniel McCullers during drills today. With powerful hip thrust upfield and working hard to keep his hands inside, Halapio had ample success working as a power blocker and generating push upfield. (January 21, 2014) Source
  • Guard Jon Halapio was once again consistent in winning leverage battles and was taking interior defenders to the ground, including Will Sutton, in one on one drills. He also showed some athleticism pulling out toward the numbers before tracking and eliminating Florida State ILB Christian Jones at the 2nd level during a team run play. (January 22, 2014) Source
  • Halapio was extremely strong and might be the most polite person I came across in all of Mobile. It was revealed that Halapio was playing this season with a torn pec, which would have been quite an undertaking. That suggests there is a ton of power he was not even able to show, but there are still concerns from the waist down. (January 27, 2014) Source

Seantrel Henderson

  • Since his high school recruitment, Henderson has attracted controversy and struggled to stay on the field with several issues with the coaches and off the field. He has an ideal build with the balance and foot athleticism to shield the pocket, but his reliability as a pro is a strong question mark. (January 19, 2014) Source
  • Miami OT Seantrel Henderson continues to be a mystery. He flashed on Monday with his strong, heavy hands to punch and control rushers. But his snap anticipation and balance were up-and-down throughout drills. It's been said time and time again, but if a NFL coaching staff can get Henderson to play focused and ambitious, they'll land themselves a very good player. He is a player to watch this week to see how he responds to the instructions of the Falcons' coaching staff. (January 20, 2014) Source
  • Someone must have had a pep talk with Seantrel Henderson this morning because he came to play today. Before practice, scouts were overheard ranting about how the Miami tackle "has looked big on the field but hasn’t played big on the field" during Senior Bowl practices. He flashed dominance (as he does on film) during the team session easily washing out the contain end to open up a huge hole for a Charles Sims touchdown. His footwork also improved as he took to coaching well during one on ones. If he wants it, there are teams that will be willing to teach him to be great. (January 22, 2014) Source
  • Miami offensive tackle Seantrel Henderson started the week strong and sort of leveled off during Wednesday's practice. Despite his size, don't consider him a left tackle prospect. He played mostly on the right side for the Hurricanes in 2013 (when he did play) and spent the whole week on the right side with Ohio State's Jack Mewhort. Think of Henderson as a late-career Bryant McKinnie. Mewhort was solid at right tackle after playing on the left side at Ohio State. (January 24, 2014) Source

Gabe Ikard

  • Ikard's quickness and tenacity will intrigue zone-blocking teams but he's struggled with the massive defenders in Mobile. (January 21, 2014) Source

Ju'Wuan James

  • Tennessee right tackle Ju'Wuan James hasn't received a lot of fanfare but he is a smooth athlete at 6-foot-6, 315 pounds. He was beaten on occasion but plays with terrific knee bend and got to the second level during scrimmages. (January 19, 2014) Source
  • For an upside tackle prospect, Ja’Wuan James had his base exposed multiple times in run blocking drills. Still, he did showcase the ability to reset his anchor and recover when moved off his pass set. (January 20, 2014) Source

Gabe Jackson

  • Fellow interior lineman Gabe Jackson entered the week as the 2014 draft’s top interior offensive lineman, but has been inconsistent. He’s a thick, strong-handed, powerful blocker, but he struggled shuffling laterally versus quicker interior rushers. In one-on-one situations, Jackson has the strength and power to win, but he hasn’t been a dominant force this week. (January 21, 2014) Source
  • If someone was going to build a guard from scratch, it would look like Jackson. He was unbelievably strong and impressive in person. Jackson did show just how critical consistent technique was when he went up against Aaron Donald and it did not go well for him. (January 27, 2014) Source

Wesley Johnson

  • Former Vanderbilt standout Wesley Johnson looked out of place at times, lacking the anchor or wide base to win consistently during pit drills. Late with his punch and allowing defenders into his smallish frame, Johnson was in recovery mode for most of his individual reps. (January 20, 2014) Source
  • Wesley Johnson of Vanderbilt showed he’s likely not an NFL tackle, but could provide quality depth across the line. In a zone blocking scheme, Johnson could be a developmental starter. (January 21, 2014) Source
  • Among offensive linemen at the Senior Bowl, none are more versatile than Vanderbilt's Wesley Johnson. He can line up anywhere along the line. That will make him a valuable commodity, though some were turned off when he came in weighing just 290 pounds. (January 24, 2014) Source

Tyler Larsen

  • Utah State center Tyler Larsen had a strong showing during one on one’s, particularly against the (likely) biggest winner of the week, Aaron Donald. He was exceptional in keeping Donald at bay consistently fighting for leverage through his block and sliding cleanly to mirror Donald’s counters. While his arm length is a concern (30.5 inches), Larsen wins by battling underneath the reach of bigger interior linemen and constantly moving his hands. (January 22, 2014) Source

Zack Martin

  • Arguably the top overall prospect in Mobile this week, Martin started four seasons for the Irish at left tackle and showed steady improvement each season. There is some debate as to whether he should stay at tackle or move to guard, but regardless, he projects as a 10-year NFL starter. (January 19, 2014) Source
  • On the offensive side of the ball, Martin locked down the blindside for most of the day, showing his trademark patience, forceful hands and underrated athleticism. While he generally played well, Martin's lack of ideal size was exposed a bit by some of the longer defensive ends he faced during Tuesday's practice, most notably West Virginia's Will Clarke, a 6-foot-6, 271-pounder with nearly 34" arms. While Notre Dame's standout handled speed rushers, Clarke used his long arms to keep Martin's hands from grabbing hold of him. Unable to latch on, Martin was beaten to the outside, on occasion, reinforcing the theory that while he could remain at tackle in the NFL, he projects as a potential Pro Bowl guard. (January 21, 2014) Source
  • During off-season preparation for the 2013 season, Notre Dame OL Zack Martin emerged as one of Dane Brugler's "prospect crushes" because of his ability square, punch and mirror rushers. He has lined up at both guard and tackle this week and routinely stymied the competition with quickness, power and overall technique. Martin is very good at keeping his feet underneath him while keeping his butt low to handle both speed and power. His lack of elite lateral range was tested on a few occasions, which is why his best NFL position is inside at guard. However, he has been one of the few blockers this week who has been able to keep up with Pittsburgh DT Aaron Donald. Entering the week, Martin was Brugler's top overall player participating in Mobile and after three days of practice, that's not changing any time soon. Some teams will look to keep him at tackle, but he is a future Pro Bowler at guard. (January 22, 2014) Source
  • If Donald has been the best player at Senior Bowl practices, Notre Dame offensive tackle Zack Martin has been the second best player. Martin showed his aggressive streak on Wednesday in offensive versus defensive linemen drills. On one play he turned Missouri's Michael Sam and drove him into the ground. With his play in Mobile, Martin may be establishing himself as a first-round pick. The question is whether a team will pull the trigger on him as a tackle or if he'll be viewed as a guard. (January 22, 2014) Source
  • The overarching opinion about Martin is that, at worst, he's a good offensive tackle in the NFL. The other end of that scale is that he's an All-Pro guard. Martin was used all week as the North team's left tackle, partly because of the players in attendance. Even at tackle Martin looked good driving defenders into the ground. If there's a discussion about which Senior Bowl participant gets taken first in the draft, Martin should be a part of it. (January 24, 2014) Source
  • The unquestioned top offensive lineman in Mobile this week was Notre Dame's Zach Martin, who starred at left tackle for the Irish but projects better at guard due to his short arms. (January 25, 2014) Source

Jack Mewhort

  • Ohio State OT Jack Mewhort lined up at right tackle and did an excellent job sinking his butt, digging his cleats in the ground and stonewalling rushers. He lined up across from North Carolina DE Kareem Martin (and his long 34 3/8" arms) several times and Mewhort did an excellent job combating hand moves and riding him past the pocket. The former Buckeye is built well for the right tackle position at 6-6 and 306 pounds and has shown consistent improvement from his underclassmen days. (January 20, 2014) Source
  • During the North's practice period, Mewhort lined up at right tackle after playing left tackle for the Buckeyes. There's not a lot of flash in Mewhort's game, but he was hard to move when he set in his stance. (January 20, 2014) Source
  • Jack Mewhort has been working at guard and tackle this week and many believe he can start at both positions in the NFL. He had a really impressive day as he consistently displayed a heavy anchor, proper slide technique, and efficient hand usage against opponents. Even better was his determination to finish during the last padded practice. He worked Hageman to the ground during one on one’s and flattened North Carolina DE Kareem Martin in team. (January 22, 2014) Source
  • Ohio State OT Jack Mewhort looked strong during drills for the third straight practice on Wednesday, making it a chore for rushers to line up across from him. The former Buckeye blocker lined up primarily at right tackle and did an excellent job sinking his lower body at the point of attack to anchor, dig his cleats in the ground and be a stubborn lineman to move from his spot. Mewhort utilizes every inch of his tall, stout frame (6-foot-6, 306 pounds) and large winspan (80 1/4") to engulf and control rushers. Based off tape and his performance in Mobile this week, Mewhort looks every bit the part of a future starting right tackle in the NFL. (January 22, 2014) Source

Morgan Moses

  • Notre Dame's Zack Martin entered the week as NFLDraftScout.com's top-rated offensive lineman participating in the Senior Bowl but with a terrific performance Tuesday afternoon by Virginia's Morgan Moses could result in a significant jump up the board.

    Alternately lining up at left and right tackle for the South team, the 6-foot-6, 325 pound behemoth showcased the length, quickness and balance to handle speed rushers like Auburn's Dee Ford (6-foot-2, 243 pounds) and Arkansas' Chris Smith (6-foot-1, 266 pounds), as well as powerful defenders like his former teammate, 6-foot-6, 298-pound defensive end Brent Urban.

    Individual pass-rush drills favor the defensive players but other than one exception in which Ford beat Moses with a quick jab-step inside and explosive burst to his right, Moses handled left tackle duties well. When moved back to the right side, Moses also performed admirably, burying Urban with an emphatic pancake block that drew gasps from scouts in the stands.

    Best of all, Moses' strong play continued into the scrimmages run by the Jacksonville Jaguars' coaching staff. One particular three-play sequence against the defenders in the South team's red jerseys showcased Morgan's pro-readiness:

  1. On "first down" Moses handled a speed rush from Ford to give his quarterback enough time to complete a quick swing pass to the right.

  2. The next play was a run to the right for solid gain. Moses did not supply a block at the point of attack on the play, instead releasing to run approximately 20 yards downfield to force adjustments from a linebacker and safety. The quickness off the ball, fluidity and straight-line speed Moses used to part the defense was every bit as impressive as the pancake block he'd delivered on Urban during the earlier one-on-one drill.

  3. Appropriately enough, it was Urban who lined up opposite Moses on the next play. Attacking Moses with a strong bull rush that had beaten several other South team blockers throughout the day, Urban instead was stopped in his tracks due to a strong anchor and good core flexibility from the left tackle. (January 21, 2014) Source

  • In offensive line drills, Virginia's Morgan Moses is an impressive physical blocker. Playing both the left and the right, Moses held his own against Ford and pushed Arkansas' Chris Smith and Virginia defensive end Brent Urban around. When Moses sets and gets his hands on a defender, he doesn't get pushed back. (January 21, 2014) Source
  • Morgan Moses of Virginia looks the part of an NFL offensive tackle, and his kick slide is adequate to go along with the length he possesses to have success on the edge. However, his ability to track his blocks downfield along with struggles against bull rushers at times could cause concerns for teams. (January 21, 2014) Source
  • Moses – who's arm length is as impressive as his beard – should have a solid career in the NFL. He's not a top-level blocker, but looks like someone who will be dependable for a long time. His play is reminiscent of King Dunlap of the San Diego Chargers. (January 24, 2014) Source
  • At 6-foot-6, 325 pounds, Moses possesses the frame you'd expect of a dominating run blocker and he showed the ability to clear wide rushing lanes throughout the week. Moses boosted his stock this week, however, by providing reliable pass protection, demonstrating the arm length (34 3/4"), balance and surprising athleticism teams are looking for in a top-64 selection. (January 25, 2014) Source

Cyril Richardson

  • DT Aaron Donald was an unstoppable force on Monday. Like his play all season, the Pitt defensive tackle was extremely quick in drills and was relentless from snap to whistle. His burst and anticipation off the snap and active energy to fight through and around blocks make him tough for any blocker to handle. Donald repeatedly victimized Baylor OG Cyril Richardson at practice, winning with leverage, hustle and fluidity that Richardson has likely never seen before on the football field. Donald's skill-set is ideal for one-on-one drills so he should shine, but the NFL team that drafts him will get a really good football player. (January 20, 2014) Source
  • Baylor guard Cyril Richardson and Stanford edge rusher Trent Murphy, two players who I've previously ranked highly, are thus far struggling to adapt to the different schemes used by the Atlanta Falcons' coaching staff. Richardson, a monstrous man at 6-foot-4 (and a 1/2) and 348 pounds is fine when asked to block straight-ahead, which he did so impressively on a few occasions against Donald, pancaking Pittsburgh's star on one occasion. Richardson's lack of ideal lateral agility and balance was exposed by Donald on numerous other snaps during one-on-one drills, however. More alarming was the inconsistency the former Baylor Bear showed during scrimmages, too often losing his balance and slipping off blocks. (January 21, 2014) Source
  • (Aaron) Donald has been especially impressive against Baylor guard Cyril Richardson, who has done little to help his cause this week. Richardson's issues are with his stance. He keeps a narrow base and loses his power. When he's in space, he doesn't have the movement skills to stay with quick defenders. (January 22, 2014) Source
  • Baylor's Cyril Richardson had as bad of a week as you've read about. For a 343-pound player, he got pushed around too much by opposing linemen. Richardson's issue is his stance. He's too narrow off the snap, negating any power advantage he may have. If he can fix that, and drop some weight, he should be fine. (January 24, 2014) Source
  • At 6-foot-4, 344 pounds, Richardson is a massive interior presence, but he struggled with quicker defensive tackles throughout the week of practice (especially Donald) and wasn't nearly as powerful as a drive blocker as one might expect given his size. (January 25, 2014) Source

Weston Richburg

  • Colorado State center Weston Richburg continued his strong week of practices without another standout showing on Wednesday. Richburg is lightning quick out of his snap stance and into his blocking stance. He uses that quickness to get leverage and make up for the power advantage defensive linemen have against him. He's been the only player who can block (Aaron) Donald this week. (January 22, 2014) Source
  • No center looked better this week than Richburg. That's impressive considering the group featured Travis Swanson of Arkansas and Gabe Ikard of Oklahoma. Richburg flashed the speed to snap the ball and get into his stance in a hurry. Richburg was virtually the only player to give Donald trouble this week. (January 24, 2014) Source
  • Arkansas' Travis Swanson entered the week as the nation's top center prospect, but an impressive showing by another CSU Ram has his stock rising quickly. Richburg showed the anchor to handle powerful bull-rushers, as well as impressive agility in getting to the second level. (January 25, 2014) Source
  • Richburg shows a suddenness and quickness that is unmatched by any other offensive lineman in Mobile. He has been matched up against Donald on many occasions in practices, fairing extremely well, and a big reason for his success is his footwork. Good coaching and natural ability shine out of the Ram. Alge Crumpler, a former first-round draft pick as a tight end, sat in many offensive meeting rooms in his 10-year NFL career. He knows a good offensive lineman when he sees one. Richburg was the kid he told me to keep an eye on at the Senior Bowl, and he was right. (January 24, 2014) Source

Travis Swanson

  • Swanson has also been a bit inconsistent, though most of the struggles he's had over the first two days have come when he's lined up at guard, rather than center. Swanson starred for the Razorbacks at center, showing impressive agility and power in the pivot but at 6-foot-5, 310 pounds, he projects better to guard or even tackle in the opinion of some scouts. (January 21, 2014) Source
  • Finally, Travis Swanson was the clear best center, and despite some struggles in one-on-ones with Will Sutton and Daniel McCullers, Swanson has shown he’s a future NFL starter on the inside. (January 21, 2014) Source
  • His week in Mobile just did not match up to what he has put out on tape, where he was far more impressive. For whatever reason, he was simply not the same guy. He is massive for a center.(January 27, 2014) Source

Brandon Thomas

  • Clemson OT Brandon Thomas played left tackle in college, but he projects better at guard where he can operate in a smaller space and that showed in practice on Monday. He measured in at 34 3/8" arms and will use that length to engage and bury defenders – just ask fellow ACC prospect DE James Gayle out of Virginia Tech who Thomas dominated a few times. But the former Clemson blocker also struggled in space during drills, bringing up questions on whether or not he should stay on the edges. (January 20, 2014) Source
  • One player lacking elite measurables who pleasantly surprised me along the line of scrimmage today was Clemson tackle Brandon Thomas. While shorter than ideal at 6-foot-3 (and a 1/2), the 316-pounder has good balance and the reach (34 3/8" arms) to latch and control on the perimeter. He, like Martin, may project best inside for some but handled speed and strength, alike, during Tuesday's practice. (January 21, 2014) Source
  • There is almost no flash to Thomas' game. He's not the biggest, longest or the quickest. He's just a solid mauler who should transition nicely to guard in the NFL. This week he showed good hand work and aggressiveness and earned the praise of Atlanta Falcons offensive line coach Mike Tice on a few occasions. (January 24, 2014) Source
  • The unquestioned top offensive lineman in Mobile this week was Notre Dame's Zach Martin, who starred at left tackle for the Irish but projects better at guard due to his short arms. Thomas didn't earn nearly the media attention but also performed well at tackle despite a frame (6-foot-3 and a 1/2, 314 pounds) that suggests he too will be making the move inside in the NFL. Late in the game, Thomas was playing outside at tackle with Martin asked to move inside to guard. (January 25, 2014) Source

Billy Turner

  • The cornerstone of an offensive line that helped NDSU win three straight FCS titles, Turner is a mobile and tough blocker with controlled movements to be effective at the line of scrimmage and at the second level. He is another candidate to possibly move inside to guard. (January 19, 2014) Source
  • As impressive James was, arguably the most impressive offensive lineman of the day was North Dakota State's Billy Turner, who possesses a very similar build at 6-foot-5, 316 pounds. Unlike James, Turner struggles a bit with leverage, bending at the waist rather than the knees but he has strong hands and is a good athlete who projects as a quality NFL starter with a little refinement. His upside could push Turner into the top 100 picks, if he isn't there already. (January 19, 2014) Source
  • Yes, he plays on the South squad and this is a North practice review, but I feel compelled to mention North Dakota State OL Billy Turner. He lined up at guard and tackle during practice and showed off his quick feet, upper body strength and mean punch to handle rushers. If Turner can learn to consistently sink his hips and not bend so much at the waist, I truly believe there are several Pro Bowls in his future. (January 20, 2014) Source
  • North Dakota State offensive tackle Billy Turner struggled with his leverage and blocking posture throughout the practice, but really stood out with his hand strength strike. At tackle, he displayed adequate foot speed but he’ll need to correct waist-bending issues. (January 20, 2014) Source
  • North Dakota State offensive lineman Billy Turner fit right in with his FBS competition. Turner is a powerful blocker and it showed. He lined up at multiple positions and was as effective at guard as he was at tackle. (January 20, 2014) Source
  • North Dakota State’s Billy Turner entered the week with a lot of buzz, including from Optimum Scouting. It was thought that he could emerge as a Top 40 pick with a strong week. He’s been able to show his powerful hands and ability to drive downfield as a power run blocker, but he struggled mightily in his kick slide in pass protection, getting abused a handful of times by Dee Ford and Chris Smith. Teams likely will consider moving him to guard, where he could thrive, but keep an eye out this week to see if he can improve and cement his offensive tackle projection. (January 21, 2014) Source
  • On the offensive line, North Dakota State's Billy Turner enjoyed a nice bounce-back effort on Wednesday after struggling a bit with speed yesterday. Playing predominately inside at right guard (though also seeing some time at right tackle), the athletic small-schooler showed renewed aggression and strong hands to latch on and control defenders. (January 22, 2014) Source

DL

Deandre Coleman

  • Cal's Deandre Coleman enjoyed a solid day on the interior, repeatedly pushing through Oklahoma's Gabe Ikard and Arkansas' Travis Swanson. Powerful and surprisingly athletic, the 6-foot-5, 315 pounder is position and scheme versatile, though scouts are left to question where this passionate play was throughout a disappointing senior season in the Pac-12. (January 21, 2014) Source
  • Deandre Coleman did some things today that made me think he could wind up as a 34 nose for some teams. Besides size, upper body strength is his best attribute and he consistently locks out interior linemen at the point but he doesn’t possess the quick feet or polished rush moves to create penetration. He did, however, show the ability to occupy 2-3 blockers throughout practice without losing much positional integrity. He was also receptive to the coaching he received for his hand use which he subsequently improved by the end of the day. (January 22, 2014) Source

Aaron Donald

  • Despite lacking ideal size and frame for an interior rusher, Donald is an active, energetic player who uses first step quickness and natural leverage to power into the backfield. He won't be a fit for everyone, but Donald has a relentless motor to fight through the whistle and is a pesky guy to block. (January 19, 2014) Source
  • DT Aaron Donald was an unstoppable force on Monday. Like his play all season, the Pitt defensive tackle was extremely quick in drills and was relentless from snap to whistle. His burst and anticipation off the snap and active energy to fight through and around blocks make him tough for any blocker to handle. Donald repeatedly victimized Baylor OG Cyril Richardson at practice, winning with leverage, hustle and fluidity that Richardson has likely never seen before on the football field. Donald's skill-set is ideal for one-on-one drills so he should shine, but the NFL team that drafts him will get a really good football player. (January 20, 2014) Source
  • He was practically unblockable in one-on-one drills. In full team drills the offense had to use multiple blockers on him. Donald's first move, for a 288-pounder, is incredible. He'll get knocked because of his size, but Donald is going to make an impact at the next level. Donald was often lined up against Baylor guard Cyril Richardson, who is susceptible to quicker players. (January 20, 2014) Source
  • Donald's burst makes him a terror during individual pass-rush drills but at a shade under 6-foot-1 and 288 pounds, he projects best as a pass-rush specialist three-technique defensive tackle in the 4-3 alignment. A team in need of an interior pass rusher certainly could justify selecting him in the first round because Donald could emerge as a 8-10 sack threat in the NFL but he'll almost certainly be doing so as a rotational player -- which not every team in the league is comfortable to dedicating a first round pick towards. (January 21, 2014) Source
  • If it wasn't official before the third day of Senior Bowl practices, it is now. Pittsburgh defensive tackle Aaron Donald is the best player in Mobile. For the third-straight practice, Donald was disruptive in one-on-one drills and full team drills. If there is a spot for Donald in the first round of the draft, it could be the Chicago Bears with the No. 14 pick. (January 22, 2014) Source
  • Aaron Donald was once again absolutely dominant for the 3rd day in a row. In one on one’s, the Pitt product was unblockable (and it wasn’t close) with the exception of his matchups with Tyler Larson and Jack Mewhort. His first step is exceptional and he’s a master of the leverage game, attacking opponents’ shells from the ground up. Baylor’s Cyril Richardson really struggled to react and match foot speed against Donald’s swim move a number of occasions. (January 22, 2014) Source
  • Each and every North team practice in Mobile, Donald turned the Senior Bowl into the Aaron Donald Bowl. He's a player where you throw any size issues out the window. The Geno Atkins comparisons are real because Donald likes to use his quickness to get under offensive linemen, turn them and split the gap. (January 24, 2014) Source
  • It was Donald, not Ford, who earned most of the buzz early in the week, whipping interior offensive linemen with his quickness, tenacity and underrated strength. Like Ford, Donald's size (6-foot-1, 288 pounds) limits his fits in the NFL but his ability to pressure quarterbacks could earn him a first-round selection. (January 25, 2014) Source

Justin Ellis

  • Louisiana Tech DT Justin Ellis picked up right where he left off last week at the Shrine Game, using his quickness and snap anticipation to surge past blockers before they were in a stance. He is a quick thinker and reacts well to what the blocker wants to do, either attacking with pure momentum or using a spin or sidestep move to get past him. Ellis, who weighed nine pounds lighter from the Shrine Game weigh-ins, has helped himself as much as anyone the past two weeks and shouldn't last long on the draft's third day. (January 20, 2014) Source
  • Ellis, who starred at the Shrine Game before getting called up to the Senior Bowl this week, looked good. He moves well for a defensive tackle who is more than 340 pounds. (January 20, 2014) Source
  • Ellis looked like he could have used a manzier at the weigh-in, but he moved well when the ball was snapped. He demonstrated a surprising amount of ability to rush the passer at 360lbs. It is not like anyone is going to bring him in on passing situations to get to the quarterback, but he was surprisingly nimble in spots. (January 27, 2014) Source
  • I think he fits the run-stuff, hole-collapsing 3-technique very well, but doesn't seem to have a great grasp on rushing the passer. He lacks any sort of rush moves (has a terrible rip move), and only has success when he drives with extension. I think he can play both interior tackle roles in the NFL, and likely best as a 3rd defensive tackle in the NFL. (February 5, 2014) Source

Dee Ford

  • The Tigers top pass rusher this season, Ford tallied 10.5 sacks as an edge rusher with his natural athleticism and quick acceleration off the snap. He shows natural bend and flexibility and has some hybrid qualities so he will be evaluated differently by 4-3 and 3-4 teams. (January 19, 2014) Source
  • Given his 6-foot-2, 243-pound frame, perhaps it isn't surprising that Auburn's Dee Ford was the most explosive of the South's pass-rushers but he certainly showed the burst to catch the attention of every scout in the stands. Ford is stronger than his size indicates and carried over the strong senior campaign that helped his Tigers qualify for the national championship game into Monday's practice. (January 19, 2014) Source
  • Dee Ford from Auburn also showed off his twitchy skill set, but surprised with his ability to leverage inside hand placement and work through the base of his opponent. He’s a speed guy off the edge and continues to impress there. However, it’s his ability to vary his takeoff angles and set up opponents that stood out in his practice today. (January 20, 2014) Source
  • Auburn defensive end Dee Ford had another good day. It's between he and Pittsburgh's Aaron Donald thus far for best performance in Mobile. When Ford keeps tight around the edge, he's been a dangerous player. He's even caught the eye of South head coach Gus Bradley of the Jacksonville Jaguars. "Dee is exciting," Bradley said after practice. "I really like his personality, I like his spirit, he loves the game and he showcases that on the practice field. Anytime a guy can come off the edge and show the ability to have some rushes in him, it really stands out."Bradley indicated that Ford could work as the Leo in his team's unique 4-3 scheme. (January 21, 2014) Source

  • If there’s one prospect that may begin to earn first round grades from NFL teams after this week, it’s Auburn’s Dee Ford. Possessing remarkable quickness off the edge and play that embarrassed offensive tackles at times, Ford has proven that he can have consistent success. Ford also has a natural spin move and outside-in rushes that showcase his versatility as a rusher. (January 21, 2014) Source
  • Coming into the week, some wondered what Ford's best position was going forward. If the Senior Bowl is any indication, he can hang as a defensive end. On the first day of practices, a coach got after him for going too wide around the corner. For the rest of the week, that never happened. Ford is lightning quick off the edge and violent with his hands to shed blocks. (January 24, 2014) Source
  • Ford impressed with a chiseled build at 6-foot-2, 243 pounds during the weigh-in and was virtually unstoppable off the edge during the practices, showing burst, bend and closing speed. He was the most dynamic player on the field during the game, recording two sacks and timing a leap to knock down a pass to earn MVP honors. Ford's dominant week boosted his stock at least a full round and could result in a top 32 selection. (January 25, 2014) Source

Ra'Shede Hagemen

  • Another highly regarded lineman who showed impressive weight distribution, measuring in at exactly 6-6 and 318 pounds. His arms (33¾ inches) were also among the longest of any of the defensive tackles measured Monday. (January 20, 2014) Source
  • The well-built Hageman flashed dominating strength and length, routinely driving opponents into the backfield with a his bull rush and showing impressive burst for a man of his imposing 6-foot-6, 318-pound frame. Hageman was tough to handle in one-on-one drills -- putting Miami guard Brandon Linder on his back during one particularly explosive rush -- but carried over his impressive play into the full 11-on-11 scrimmages, as well. He remains a prospect who flashes rather than consistently dominates but considering his power, size and athleticism, teams operating under 4-3 and 3-4 principles, alike, were taking notice. (January 21, 2014) Source

  • Minnesota defensive tackle Ra’Shede Hageman is massive but he’s not as limber as teams might prefer. From drills to team sessions, Hageman lacked explosion and had issues finishing the entire day. He was noticeably frustrated during one on ones as he struggled to shed blocks and was eventually pancaked badly by Mewhort toward the end of the session. (January 22, 2014) Source
  • From a physical standpoint, no players were more imposing that Minnesota defensive tackle Ra'Shede Hageman and Virginia offensive tackle Morgan Moses. Hageman has a future either as a traditional 4-3 defensive tackle or as a five technique end in a 3-4. (January 24, 2014) Source

Adrian Hubbard

  • A rare fourth-year junior participating in Mobile, Hubbard decided to skip his senior year despite an inconsistent 2013 season in Tuscaloosa. He finished his junior year with 33 tackles and three sacks as the Tide's SAM linebacker and has several questions to answer regarding his range and reaction quickness. (January 19, 2014) Source
  • Scouts will be intrigued with Hubbard's length at nearly 6-6 but there was surprisingly little muscular development on his 255-pound frame. For a player coming off a disappointing junior season and yet elected to enter the NFL Draft with a year of collegiate eligibility remaining, it wasn't the best impression to make. (January 20, 2014) Source
  • Jeremiah Attaochu of Georgia Tech and Adrian Hubbard of Alabama looked a bit out of place at their positions today, but it’s clear they have the natural talent to work with. As for Hubbard, he currently lacks an NFL position, but he’s a moldable talent that could fit in any defense, but will need ample time before he can consistently contribute. (January 20, 2014) Source
  • Alabama’s Adrian Hubbard has yet to find a place on the field he’s comfortable with. Today, it was clear he’s not built to play from outside linebacker spot. He plays way too high and exposes his entire torso as a pass rusher. An anti-space defender, Hubbard may need to focus on mastering an end role with his hand in the dirt. (January 21, 2014) Source
  • Stanford outside linebacker / defensive end Trent Murphy had a rough week at times. He was working out with the defensive ends the whole week and needs to add more power to stick there. Alabama's Adrian Hubbard is another player who needs to get stronger at the point of attack. Neither did much to help their cause in Mobile. (January 24, 2014) Source
  • Adrian Hubbard of Alabama needs a lot of work, but I'm not sure he's even worth it. He's truly position-less at this point, and despite his upside, I'm not sure I'd even draft him. (February 5, 2014) Source

Christian Jones

  • Christian Jones, came alive as the week went along. He was at his best this season when Florida State moved him down to defensive end, but he should have a career as an outside linebacker in the NFL. He's quick to get off blocks, natural in space and just generally a playmaker. He's probably a second-round choice, but a 3-4 team should pounce on him. (January 24, 2014) Source

Kareem Martin

  • It would have been nice to see North Carolina defensive end Kareem Martin play more physical. He definitely passes the eye test and has a nice first step. But against strong offensive tackles, he can get stonewalled. Looking at Martin, you expect him to play like Cincinnati Bengals free agent Michael Johnson, but he doesn't always. (January 24, 2014) Source

Daniel McCullers

  • A notable player who struggled for the South on Monday was Tennessee defensive tackle Daniel McCullers. He was pushed around by Oklahoma's Gabe Ikard several times and gets too high to be a factor inside. (January 20, 2014) Source
  • Like Coleman, Tennessee defensive tackle Daniel McCullers bullied opponents with his power, slipping past Swanson with a good rip move early during the one-on-one drills. McCullers, 6-foot-7 and 348 pounds, struggles with leverage, playing much higher than the rest of the South defensive linemen. This allows technicians like Florida State's Bryan Stork (6-foot-4, 306 pounds) to turn and seal the massive Volunteer from the play despite a significant weight disadvantage. (January 21, 2014) Source
  • Big Daniel McCullers of Tennessee could have struggled in this environment due to his immense size and question marks about his stamina and motor while in college. While he does still play consistently high off the snap and seems to lack great bend, he was consistently able to over-power blockers with his upper body and hands strength. He’s a work in progress technique-wise, but his natural talent and ability are unquestioned. (January 21, 2014) Source
  • Daniel McCullers is a massive human but he’s way too stiff in everything he does. His movements are also very deliberate making it easy for offensive linemen to target his chest and beat him with leverage. He might find a role in the NFL as a 1-gap occupier but his upside looks limited. (January 22, 2014) Source

Trent Murphy

  • Baylor guard Cyril Richardson and Stanford edge rusher Trent Murphy, two players who I've previously ranked highly, are thus far struggling to adapt to the different schemes used by the Atlanta Falcons' coaching staff. Murphy, a playmaking outside linebacker for a highly physical Stanford squad, is also having a tough time adjusting as the Falcons are asking him to play defensive end. While known for his toughness and physicality with the Cardinal, Murphy looked surprisingly lean during Monday's weigh-ins, showing little upper body development on his 6-foot-5, 253-pound frame. He has strong, active hands to knock away blockers' attempts to latch on and accelerates around the edge in a controlled, efficient manner. He isn't an explosive athlete in any way, however, leading to questions about where he'll fit at the next level as he does not possess great burst nor the strength teams are looking for in an end capable of setting the edge. (January 21, 2014) Source
  • Stanford outside linebacker / defensive end Trent Murphy had a rough week at times. He was working out with the defensive ends the whole week and needs to add more power to stick there. Alabama's Adrian Hubbard is another player who needs to get stronger at the point of attack. Neither did much to help their cause in Mobile. (January 24, 2014) Source

Caraun Reid

  • One could quickly tell that Reid spent more than his share of time in the weight room rather than just in the library as the Ivy Leaguer showed off a surprisingly well-built frame at 6-2 (and 1/8 inch) and 301 pounds. While perhaps a bit shorter than scouts would like, Reid's impressive frame and adequate arm length (32 5/8 inches) helped the small-schooler stand out amongst FBS stars. (January 20, 2014) Source
  • Princeton's Caraun Reid stood out. Reid is a compactly built tackle who excelled when he could get under linemen and use his hands. Reid is an active player and showed good lateral movement. (January 20, 2014) Source
  • Another small schooler who has helped himself is Princeton defensive tackle Caraun Reid. When he worked on the left side of the line in spirited 11-on-11drills Wednesday, he often won at the point of attack. He's had no trouble fitting in against ACC and SEC competition. (January 22, 2014) Source
  • The well-built Ivy Leaguer proved with a competitive week of practice that he was every bit the talent as the more well-known prospects he was facing each snap. He capped off the week with sacks on back-to-back plays during the game, showing the lateral burst and closing speed to project nicely as a three-technique defensive tackle. (January 25, 2014) Source
  • He's really Aaron Donald-lite in that he's consistently active initially, plays with quick hands, and can get penetration with multiple rush moves. He's not quite as good in every area like Donald is, but he certainly gets the same penetration. (February 5, 2014) Source

Chris Smith

  • Easily the standout performer along the defensive line, Arkansas’ Chris Smith not only looked the part in weigh-ins, but excelled in all aspects of the practice. Smith has extreme suddenness out of his stance, plays comfortably with sink to his hips and understands how to utilize his 34" arms effectively to set the edge. (January 20, 2014) Source
  • Along with Ford, Chris Smith of Arkansas had another fantastic day, being the quickest off the snap of the defensive linemen. He’s an explosive athlete who’s able to play low and with quick hands to consistently disengage and keep pass blockers off balance. He wasn’t as speedy as Ford, but he made his impact felt very similarly to opposing blockers. (January 21, 2014) Source

Will Sutton

  • After an outstanding junior campaign, Sutton had an up-and-down senior season, flashing the same penetrating quickness, but just not consistently. He will need a big week in Mobile to prove to scouts that they're drafting the 2012 version of Sutton, not the tight, streaky player from this past year. (January 19, 2014) Source
  • Arizona State defensive tackle Will Sutton didn't have the most impressive weigh-in but he showed off his athleticism with a terrific spin move to beat Arkansas center Travis Swanson (who was playing guard) during one-on-one drills late in practice. (January 19, 2014) Source
  • Arizona State’s Will Sutton didn’t look good carrying his extra weight through bag drills and had difficulty clearing his hips during rip technique drills, yet he was still the most active interior tackle during 9 on 7 drills and also impressed during pit drills. He absorbed first contact very well and consistently forced his way to the heel line. (January 20, 2014) Source
  • Though he was listed at 265 pounds for much of his career with the Sun Devils, scouts knew that Sutton was in fact much bigger. He gained more weight for his senior season and wasn't as effective in 2013, despite the fact that he was rewarded with the Pac-12 Defensive Player of the Year award. Some of that extra weight was clearly around his middle as Sutton weighed in at 315 pounds at just under 6-1. Worse, his 30 5/8-inch arms were the shortest of any of the defensive tackles measured Monday. (January 20, 2014) Source
  • Will Sutton of Arizona State is still working to lower his weight during this draft season after playing the year at 325 pounds because his coaches asked him too. His goal is to get back down to 300 pounds by the NFL Combine, which could further help his quickness after his first rush. He uses his hands well, attacking guards and centers with quick, decisive movements and generating pressure initially with high frequency. However, when he didn’t win initially, he struggled to recover. (January 21, 2014) Source
  • In Mobile, Sutton has flashed the fast hands that made him one of college football's most disruptive defensive linemen. But as much as his hands and quick feet have helped him, some offensive linemen can take advantage of it and drive him out of the play. (January 22, 2014) Source
  • Arizona State defensive tackle Will Sutton is a player who is in the process of dropping some pounds. He had an up-and-down week, but flashed quick, violent hands. After Thursday's practice, in which Sutton pulled in an interception, he told me his game is built around his hands first and then his power and foot quickness. If he can get in shape, he could do a lot for a team what Donald will do. (January 24, 2014) Source
  • Former Washington Redskins and Houston Texans general manager Charlie Casserly made a great point to me about Sutton. He said that it appeared Sutton’s range of effectiveness was limited. I agree with him. At 315 pounds, Sutton is too heavy and lost his ability to make plays 3-5 yards in the backfield like he did during the 2012 season when he tallied 13 sacks and was tops in the nation in tackles for loss. But he still has a tremendous first step, and that sudden explosiveness is a great asset for an interior defensive lineman. If he sheds some excess weight, he’ll take better advantage of that first-step gift and be much more productive. (January 24, 2014) Source

  • Sutton's quickness and power helped him record a tackle-for-loss early in the game, but in weighing in at a soft 315 pounds at under 6-foot-1 did him no favors with scouts. There is no question that the reigning Defensive Player of the Year possesses talent, but questions about his commitment towards reaching his full potential could push him deep into the draft's second day. (January 25, 2014) Source

Brent Urban

  • Urban has generated some buzz in recent weeks and it is clear that his length and strength project very well as a traditional five-technique defensive end. He is very strong and uses the power in his upper body to stun and disengage from would-be blockers. He also lost track of the ball, at times, allowing runners to slip past him when he appeared to be in position to stop them. (January 21, 2014) Source
  • NFL teams may like Virginia defensive end Brent Urban because of his size and style playing as a five tech end. But he didn't do a lot this week before suffering a sprained ankle. His versatility being able to play inside and outside is his best asset. (January 24, 2014) Source

LB

Jeremiah Attaochu

  • Jeremiah Attaochu of Georgia Tech and Adrian Hubbard of Alabama looked a bit out of place at their positions today, but it’s clear they have the natural talent to work with. Attaochu will be best suited as a 3-4 rusher, and hopefully he gets that opportunity with the Jaguars running practice and utilizing that DE/OLB hybrid spot. (January 20, 2014) Source

  • Attaochu starred as a pass rusher with the Yellow Jackets, lining up as a stand-up outside linebacker and occasionally attacking the edge as a defensive end. In Mobile, however, the Jaguars' coaches have asked him to play virtually all over the field, including at inside linebacker, outside linebacker and rush from a three-point stance. Not surprisingly, Attaochu showed his greatest comfort when rushing the quarterback, demonstrating burst, agility and a powerful slap-and-sidestep to get past would-be blockers.

    Asked to play off the line of scrimmage as a traditional strongside linebacker in the Jaguars' 4-3 alignment, however, Attaochu also has shown improved recognition and gap integrity against the run, as well as patience when dropping back into coverage. On Monday, Attaochu looked like a fish out of water dropping back. Today, when running backs came into his zone, Attaochu ran with them, closing as the ball arrived and showing quick hands to rip at the ball as it arrived. Scouts knew the 6-foot-3, 253-pound Attoachu was athletic; this week he's also shown football intelligence and work ethic.(January 22, 2014) Source

  • Attaochu is another player who had a difficult time dealing with pass coverage, his center of balance was too high and he looked noticeably uncomfortable. (January 27, 2014) Source

Chris Borland

  • Borland has been compared to former Miami Dolphins stud linebacker Zach Thomas for much of his career and his instincts and open-field tackling ability warrant the mention. He looked smaller on stage than his official height (5-11 3/8 inches) and weight (245), however, and tied with former teammate, running back James White, with the shortest arms of any player measured Monday (28 5/8 inches). (January 20, 2014) Source
  • Wisconsin's Chris Borland, on the other hand, is a natural in space. If teams can get over his lack of height and arm length, he could be nice addition. A Baltimore Ravens representative spent a considerable amount of time with Borland after practice on Tuesday. (January 21, 2014) Source
  • Chris Borland excelled again in his diagnosis of plays, composed read steps and instincts. Borland fits in the run game better than any of the backers here, has the hip snap to meet blockers in the hole and stay balanced to disengage for the play. During team drills, he even showcased cover skills by baiting Logan Thomas into a interception on a late shallow cross throw over the middle of the field. Borland will be a riser for us at Optimum Scouting after this week. (January 22, 2014) Source
  • If people can look past Borland's height (he's short, not small), they'll see an active linebacker capable of making plays near the line of scrimmage. Borland looked fine in coverage drills where he was asked to backpedal, shuffle the right and then to the left. Borland has a lot to gain at the NFL Scouting Combine next month. Test poorly, and what he did this week could be negated. The issue with Borland is speed. (January 24, 2014) Source
  • The linebackers coach for the North team told me that he snuck past the film room after weigh-ins on the first day of activities, and he took note that Borland studied film for an hour. Borland wanted to get a better grasp of the defense the Atlanta Falcons coaches ran so he could perform well in practices. It worked. Borland may be undersized at 5-foot-11, but he consistently weaved his way through blocking schemes to attack running backs and showed quickness and range in his zone drops in pass coverage. You do not often see linebackers of Borland’s height playing on Sundays, but the NFL is ready for another Zach Thomas or Dat Nguyen. (January 24, 2014) Source

Christian Jones

  • Florida State linebacker Christian Jones had his best day of practice. In blocking drills, he was driving running backs into the coach acting as the quarterback. Teams will like Jones against the run and blitzing. He was exposed some when asked to drop back and cover a receiver in stride. That's something he'll need to continue working on throughout the draft process. (January 22, 2014) Source
  • On a day made for receivers to look good, Florida State linebacker Christian Jones stepped up. He was closing on the ball in a hurry (as was teammate Telvin Smith) and doing nicely in coverage. He looked shaky in coverage earlier in the week, but had a nice interception at the goal line on Thursday. (January 23, 2014) Source
  • Looks great as an athlete, but I still do not know where he plays at the next level in the NFL. His most natural fit might be as a coverage linebacker but he still has a ways to go there. (January 27, 2014) Source

Christian Kirksey

  • Another linebacker that showed out today was Iowa’s Christian Kirksey. Instinctive and fast flowing to the football, Kirksey exhibited the foot quicks and transition speed to more than adequately cover the seams as a weakside linebacker. In addition to movement skills, he flashed multiple times as a blitzer during blocking drills against the running backs and tight ends. (January 22, 2014) Source
  • Immediately Iowa's Christian Kirksey came to mind. In North drills, he looked considerably more comfortable moving in space and stopping and moving forward than the other outside linebackers. (January 24, 2014) Source
  • The Big Ten remains one of college football's most consistent producers of pro-ready linebackers and Kirksey turned heads this week with his athleticism and instincts. A particularly impressive tackle early in the Senior Bowl game showed off his closing speed. (January 25, 2014) Source

Michael Sam

  • The same can't be said for Missouri's Michael Sam, who is going from college defensive end to NFL linebacker. Thus far, the transition has been difficult. Sam was choppy in his movement in coverage drills and was out of place in team drills. When Smith is moving forward, he's fine. When he moves laterally or backward, he's just not fluid. (January 21, 2014) Source
  • Of course that group consisted of players like Michael Sam of Missouri, who is switching from defensive end. Sam struggled this week. He's a thick 260 pounds, especially in his legs. This week Sam didn't get to show off his best asset, which is rushing the passer. In space, he looked uncomfortable. A team that drafts him as a linebacker will have to put in a lot of work. (January 24, 2014) Source

Marcus Smith

  • Switching from defensive end to outside linebacker at the Senior Bowl, Smith looked natural in coverage. He was fluid in man situations during team drills when he covered Wisconsin tight end Jake Pedersen in the flat. He looked a little lost dropping in space, but Smith didn't look lost at linebacker. (January 20, 2014) Source

Telvin Smith

  • Despite being a tick undersized, Smith has the range and speed to cover both sidelines. He will get tied up and lost in a crowd, but when he has the chance to play in space or rush the pocket, few linebackers in this class display his sudden explosive qualities. (January 19, 2014) Source
  • Smith's speed is certain to get him drafted but teams may have to move him outside or perhaps drop him back to safety with a frame that looks packed out at 218 pounds. (January 20, 2014) Source
  • Speaking of Smith, he didn't take too kindly to me saying some NFL teams view him as a safety. It's true, though. It's impossible to look past him being 218 pounds. That virtually eliminates him from some teams as a linebacker. In Smith's defense, though, he has all the good intangible stuff. He was a leader on the field every day and very vocal. Maybe more important is his closing speed. He was quick to decipher where a play was developing and closes in a hurry. (January 24, 2014) Source

Kyle Van Noy

  • A jack-of-all-trades linebacker, Van Noy is a smart, versatile linebacker who scratches and crawls his way to the pocket. He has tweener traits and needs to get stronger to better match-up with NFL blockers, but his twitchy athleticism and ability to drop in coverage will be appealing to 3-4 defenses. (January 19, 2014) Source
  • Of the linebackers, I was most impressed with BYU's Kyle Van Noy, who frequently is lauded for his ability at the line of scrimmage but showed off his fluidity and instincts in coverage by closing quickly to bat away multliple passes. (January 20, 2014) Source
  • The most impressive performer of the day was BYU’s Kyle Van Noy. The most naturally balanced and controlled athlete of the linebacker group, he was the leader in each drill on day one. With the change of direction, explosiveness in his transitions upfield, and the ball skills he possesses, he’s well on his way to being a leader on his Senior Bowl team, along with a potential Top 20 pick. (January 20, 2014) Source
  • For those who follow BYU football, it shouldn’t be a surprise that Kyle Van Noy is the clear leader of the South defense. He plays fast and covers a lot of ground. Van Noy also showed outstanding hand eye coordination in finding offensive linemens’ hands and slapping them away from his body before setting them up for counter moves. (January 21, 2014) Source
  • Van Noy is a much more polished defender than Attaochu. He could have entered last year's draft and earned a top-64 selection. Some questioned his decision to return. In doing so, however, he's proven that his playmaking ways are a reflection of his terrific instincts and efficient athleticism rather than a reflection on the Cougars' level of competition.

    The 6-foot-3, 244-pound Van Noy doesn't wow you with his frame or his straight-line speed but he ranks among the country's most pro-ready defenders because he does the little things so well. Van Noy shows excellent play recognition, takes on blockers with the correct shoulder (allowing him to slide off would-be blockers and into ball-carriers easily) and is equally effective slipping into coverage or sliding past offensive linemen on his way towards a tackle behind the line of scrimmage. He's subtle rather than physical, which draws complaints from some scouts but is deadly effective. (January 22, 2014) Source

  • BYU's Kyle Van Noy was another player who got beat at times in coverage drills. On one play Lynch pushed Van Noy out of the way to get open. (January 22, 2014) Source

CB

Walt Aikens

  • Liberty cornerback Walt Aikens has also helped himself. For a bigger cornerback, he moves smoothly in his backpedal. (January 22, 2014) Source
  • Walt Aikens of Liberty was beat quite a few times today, but you can easily see he’s some minor technique changes away from those completions being pass breakups or interceptions. He’s active and powerful with his hands at the line of scrimmage, and turns and runs with plus quickness vertically. Some minor footwork adjustments, more work to stay close without interfering, and better timing of his jumps could make him a legitimate NFL starter. (January 22, 2014) Source
  • Liberty's Walt Aikens was praised by coaches several times for his closing speed. For teams wanting a bigger off-man corner, Aikens could be a solid player. (January 24, 2014) Source

Aaron Colvin

  • On the defensive side of the ball, Oklahoma cornerback Aaron Colvin demonsrated good speed and fluidity in coverage, as well as excellent leaping ability and timing to knock away passes. (January 19, 2014) Source
  • Oklahoma’s Aaron Colvin was the best cornerback on the field for the South today. He showed cat-quick feet in drills and snapped his hips exceptionally well in off coverage to break on sideline routes. Several scouts raved about his explosiveness out of breaks and his overall athleticism for the position. (January 20, 2014) Source
  • The top cornerback for the South squad was Oklahoma’s Aaron Colvin, but he suffered a major setback, sustaining a torn ACL during a drill. Before the injury, Colvin used his foot speed and quick hips to dominate. (January 21, 2014) Source
  • The most unfortunate thing that happened during practice week was Oklahoma cornerback Aaron Colvin tearing his ACL. Unquestionably this will drop him in the draft. Before he was injured, though, Colvin looked good in position drills. He could be faster to recognize plays, but every other tool is there. A team might get a steal in Colvin by drafting him late and stashing him for the year. (January 24, 2014) Source

Chris Davis

  • While Ford played well, his former Auburn teammates, Chris Davis, struggled a bit fielding punts early in the practice. Davis has a tendency to allow the ball to hit his chest plate, which results in some double-clutching. (January 19, 2014) Source Auburn corner Chris Davis also developed in confidence and fundamentals during Tuesday’s practice, being far more patient and controlled in delivering a jam. Having a firm base, strong build and explosive feet, Davis is at his best when he can initiate contact to direct the receiver’s release. At issue, though, is Davis’ off-man technique. He’ll need to improve by putting less weight distribution on his heels as the route develops. (January 21, 2014) Source
  • Auburn cornerback Chris Davis made his name in college on special teams, but he's had a nice week of practice as well. In man coverage, he can get physical and move receivers around. (January 22, 2014) Source
  • Chris Davis of Auburn had his moments today, but a large majority of his work in coverage would have been called for pass interference. He’s physical, and I like that, but the way he’s using it now won’t fly in the NFL. (January 22, 2014) Source

Pierre Desir

  • Linenwood CB Pierre Desir and Nebraska CB Stanley Jean-Baptiste are both tall, long defensive backs who have the athleticism to turn and run with receivers downfield. They both did a nice job in press-man to get physical at the line of scrimmage and then ride the receiver through the route, although both got away with a little too much holding. Neither are elite when controlling their start/stop momentum, but neither are allergic to contact either. And with several teams who utilize press-man techniques on defense looking for the next Richard Sherman, both Desir and Jean-Baptiste are players to watch this week. (January 20, 2014) Source
  • After a so-so Shrine Game week of practice, Pierre Desir of Lindenwood received the call-up to the Senior Bowl, and so far has made the most of it. Today was easily his best of the past two weeks, dominating most receivers (outside of one legal push-off by Michael Campanaro) today. His hand strength and natural press coverage ability forced two receivers on the ground and lead him to two near interceptions during team drills. (January 22, 2014) Source
  • Lindenwood cornerback Pierre Desir was a hot commodity coming into the week after excelling at the Shrine Game. He didn't do a lot to standout, but he wasn't beat that often either. (January 24, 2014) Source

Stanley Jean-Baptiste

  • Jean-Baptiste is attempting to follow the Richard Sherman path to the NFL as a big, long ex-receiver, transitioning to the secondary. However, the Nebraska corner still plays like a former receiver and hasn't shown the progression expected. Maybe NFL coaching will be the help Jean-Baptiste needs. (January 19, 2014) Source
  • Linenwood CB Pierre Desir and Nebraska CB Stanley Jean-Baptiste are both tall, long defensive backs who have the athleticism to turn and run with receivers downfield. They both did a nice job in press-man to get physical at the line of scrimmage and then ride the receiver through the route, although both got away with a little too much holding. Neither are elite when controlling their start/stop momentum, but neither are allergic to contact either. And with several teams who utilize press-man techniques on defense looking for the next Richard Sherman, both Desir and Jean-Baptiste are players to watch this week. (January 20, 2014) Source
  • Nebraska’s Stanley Jean-Baptiste likely has defensive back coaches’ mouth-watering after this week’s practice, and he showed that tremendous upside today. He sinks and cuts remarkably well in off coverage, has the length and willingness to be physical in press, and makes up speed vertically to protect against faster receivers. He has first round tools, but team’s will still need to answer just how much development he needs before he can be an instant starter. (January 22, 2014) Source
  • Nebraska's Stanley Jean-Baptiste had a decent week. He's used to playing man coverage, so he might be a little behind in zone principles. (January 24, 2014) Source
  • I'll say Stanley Jean-Baptiste needs a lot more work than people seem to think. He wasn't all that good during the week of practice when I went back and re-watched the film on Thursday night, and his footwork seems lost at the top of the receiver's route. Still, I know some teams that view him as a solid 2nd rounder. (February 5, 2014) Source

Nevin Lawson

  • Utah State cornerback Nevin Lawson was just as impressive as Ward. In man coverage drills, Lawson could stick on a receiver's hip and mirror perfectly. He fared well against taller receivers and the shorter quick receivers like Wake Forest's Michael Campanaro. The issue with Lawson was when he played off coverage. He doesn't flip his hips open fast enough to turn and run with receivers.(January 21, 2014) Source
  • Utah State’s Nevin Lawson was another Shrine Game-to-Senior Bowl call-up, and he was also one of the most impressive cornerbacks today. He stayed tight throughout his receiver’s route, and showed plus ball skills and physicality at the catch point against both receivers and tight ends. He’s sinking and using his hands to play physical in off-coverage, and is showing that he can press a little at the line of scrimmage. He’s earning his role in the NFL with impressive nickel cornerback-like ability and on special teams during practices. (January 22, 2014) Source
  • Lawson was a star in man coverage drills throughout the week. He has quick feet that allowed him to turn and move with a receiver's every motion. For a player who measured in at just under 5'10 and 184 pounds, Lawson was exceedingly physical. Lawson struggled some in off-man coverage because he waits too long to turn his hips and get down field. His style is similar to Antoine Winfield, a physical slot corner. He definitely made some money this week. (January 24, 2014) Source

Keith McGill

  • While Sullivan was working the receivers over, Philadelphia Eagles head coach Chip Kelly was intently watching the South cornerbacks. Utah's Keith McGill showed he could jam at the line but also turn and run with receivers. (January 20, 2014) Source
  • Utah cornerback Keith McGill started Senior Bowl week with an impressive Monday as he was one of the standouts from the morning weigh ins and then displayed impressive fluidity in coverage during practice. In press drills against the receivers, he sustains leverage through initial contact and uses his long arms to direct opponents at the line. During the team session, McGill was transitioning through off coverage well and showed impressive click and close ability to throws in front of him. The one surprising area he struggled in was catching the ball, especially considering his 10 ¼ hands. (January 20, 2014) Source
  • The corner with the highest ceiling looks like Utah’s Keith McGill. At 6-3, 214 pounds, he moves with tremendous fluidly through transitions and impressed during T-step redirect drills. He’s not a natural hands guy and continued to drop interception opportunities. Nevertheless, the length to affect the catch point is still overwhelming for some of the South receivers he faced. When lined up in press man, he flashed the ability to mirror and wall receivers to the sideline, but will require further development with his hand usage through the release. (January 21, 2014) Source
  • Keith McGill of Utah was having a very strong day as a press cornerback, working with his hands well and consistently forcing receivers to adjust as they work downfield. He’s been dealing with some hamstring issues this week that have limited his snaps unfortunately. (January 22, 2014) Source
  • Some flashy plays were turned in members of the secondary -- especially Liberty cornerback Walt Aikens and Vanderbilt safety Kenny Ladler -- but the news wasn't so good for Utah cornerback Keith McGill, who appeared to be battling cramps throughout the practice. McGill is a talented player whose terrific size (6-foot-3, 213 pounds) and ball-skills is sure to draw plenty of interest of teams as either a cornerback or potential safety conversion. Unfortunately, McGill appeared to feel the greatest pain on pass plays in which he was clearly already beaten. Some will credit McGill with fighting through the pain to return to the action (trainers worked on him yesterday too) but there were some in the stands who wondered aloud about his toughness. Seattle Seahawks general manager John Schneider, who, of course, has shown a fondness for lanky cornerbacks, had as good a view as anyone of McGill and their trainers working with him by observing the action from the sideline. (January 22, 2014) Source
  • If teams are looking for bigger cornerbacks like those the Seattle Seahawks use, the Senior Bowl had several of them. The biggest was Utah's Keith McGill, who came in at 6-foot-3. The potential is there with McGill, but he needs coaching up. A few times he mistimed his jump and was beaten in coverage. He's good at jamming at the line of scrimmage, but had some issues in off coverage. (January 24, 2014) Source

Jaylen Watkins

  • Although he was often overshadowed the past few seasons by the Gators deep, talented secondary, Watkins is a quick-footed and fluid athlete himself. He lacks ideal muscle, but Watkins, who is the older brother of Clemson receiver Sammy Watkins, is a tough, scrappy tackler. (January 19, 2014) Source
  • Florida defensive back Jaylen Watkins took to coaching very well and looked increasingly more confident with each rep. Soft with his hand usage on tape, Watkins progressed nicely with his press technique and earned the praise of his position coach. Even when he didn’t land a clean jam, makeup speed and route anticipation allowed him to recover. He’s an athletic corner who got his hands on throws today and proved himself to be coachable. (January 21, 2014) Source

Lavelle Westbrooks

  • On the South team, Georgia Southern cornerback Lavelle Westbrooks was rarely beaten in pass coverage situations. On one play in particular, Westbrooks worked BYU wide receiver Cody Hoffman up the left sideline on a vertical route and broke up the pass. (January 22, 2014) Source
  • Westbrooks is disciplined with his eyes after his initial three-step read, and his ability to keep his pads over the balls of his feet while backpedaling allows him to make smooth transitions and efficient breaks on the ball. While Nebraska’s Stanley Jean-Baptiste was impressive in press coverage, he seems to be still learning and getting more comfortable playing off the receiver. Westbrooks (6-0, 192) seemed to be the most well-rounded cover corner based on the practices I saw. (January 24, 2014) Source

S

Deone Bucannon

  • At a shade under 6-feet-1 and 216 pounds, Bucannon certainly passed the eyeball test, sporting a muscled-up frame that stood out in comparison to the other safeties in this game. With a 78-inch wingspan, Bucannon also had the widest of any of the safeties measured. (January 20, 2014) Source
  • Washington State safety Deone Bucannon is a player who looks like he's better in games than practice situations. That's not a bad thing. Bucannon had to hold back a few times, and that's just not his game. (January 24, 2014) Source

Marqueston Huff

  • Wyoming defensive back Marqueston Huff blanketed receivers, showcasing the light feet, fluid hips and straight-line speed to turn with the North's variety of receivers, ranging in size from former Cowboys' teammate Robert Herron (5-foot-9, 193 pounds) to Saginaw Valley State's chiseled 6-foot-2, 212-pound Jeff Janis. Huff's athleticism is sure to intrigue scouts looking for cover corners and he's previously shown the toughness to handle NFL physicality due to his time at safety at Wyoming. (January 22, 2014) Source

  • Marqueston Huff of Wyoming and Isaiah Lewis of Michigan State really struggled all day today, and neither were highly ranked on film when I saw them coming in. Both have struggled with the quality of receivers on this North Roster. (January 22, 2014) Source

Jemea Thomas

  • No defensive back stood out during practice today, but I was pleasantly surprised by Jemea Thomas of Georgia Tech for the second straight week. Playing cornerback very well this week, he played with great anticipation and burst onto the ball throughout the day. (January 22, 2014) Source
  • Versatility is what will get Georgia Tech safety Jemea Thomas drafted. He's shown he can play deep safety, but is just as comfortable lined up in the slot. He reminds me of Mike Adams of the Denver Broncos. (January 24, 2014) Source

Jimmie Ward

  • Coming off a 95-tackle, seven interception senior season, Ward has been quietly ascending up draft boards since the Fall. He is smart, heady and puts himself in position to succeed, using his speed and range to cover the deep half of the field. Look for the safety to have a big week in Mobile. (January 19, 2014) Source
  • As I mentioned in my Senior Bowl preview, Northern Illinois S Jimmie Ward is the top safety prospect in Mobile this week in my opinion and he played like it on Monday. He overcame a few poor angles early and put together a good practice, showing off his foot quickness and aggressive instincts. A Mobile-native, Ward could make a case to be the top defensive back overall this week. (January 20, 2014) Source
  • One of the few players who looked like he could hang with the athletic Ebron in coverage was Northern Illinois' Jimmie Ward. The safety who played his high school games at Ladd Peebles was comfortable dropping into the deep middle and playing up tight in man coverage. In one-on-one drills against wide receivers, Ward excelled covering Josh Huff of Oregon and Shaquelle Evans of UCLA. (January 21, 2014) Source
  • Another small but feisty defensive back catching the eye of scouts at the Senior Bowl was Northern Illinois' Jimmie Ward. While lacking the frame scouts would prefer at the position, the 5-foot-10, 193-pound Ward is an aggressive downhill tackler, who crashed the line of scrimmage in run support and raced down the field as a middle defender on kickoff coverage.

    Ward was moved all over the field by the Atlanta Falcons' coaching staff, lining up as a single-high safety, dropping down to cover tight ends as a traditional strong safety and splitting out to cover receivers out of the slot. In each case, his vision and burst to the ball consistently put him in position to make big plays.

    One particularly impressive play came while he was backed up as a deep centerfielder. Reading a wide run to the right (his left) from West Virginia running back Charles Sims, Ward exploded towards the line of scrimmage, zipping past would-be blockers to "tackle" the 6-foot, 214-pound back in the open-field. Tackling is strictly forbidden during the all-star game practices, but Ward came in so fast, Sims had no choice but to attempt a jump-cut to his right, losing his balance and falling to the ground on a play in which he appeared to have an wide lane for an easy score. (January 22, 2014) Source

  • However, Jimmie Ward of Northern Illinois impressed today. He showed plus physicality in man coverage against tight ends, and took explosive and decisive steps upfield in team drills as well. (January 22, 2014) Source
  • A practice setting isn't the best place for a safety to look good, especially when the Senior Bowl rules require a single high safety during the game. But Ward still managed to stick out compared to the other safeties this week. He's a smooth athlete and can man up against receivers. It wouldn't be a surprise if some teams look at Ward as a cornerback. (January 24, 2014) Source
  • Scouts knew heading into the Senior Bowl that Ward possessed the fluidity and instincts to cover but competition in the MAC is much different than in Mobile. Athletic enough to handle deep coverage, as well as slide down to cover slot receivers, Ward was the Senior Bowl's most impressive pass defender this year. (January 25, 2014) Source
  • I'm not sure he's best as a center fielder, but he certainly has the patient feet and anticipation to fit there. He's a do-it-all type guy, playing cornerback at a high level, covering slot receivers well, attacking upfield in a strong safety role, and showcasing the ability to play deep in the Cover-3. Selfishly, I'd rather see him in a role where he can be a 5th defensive back early in his career as opposed to playing a lot of Cover 2 early in his career. (February 5, 2014) Source

Just another great fan opinion shared on the pages of BuffaloRumblings.com.

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