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Full annual breakdowns of Tyrod Taylor's new contract

With full details regarding yearly payouts and bonuses, we can now take a look at the annual cash and cap breakdowns of Tyrod Taylor's long-term contract extension.

Timothy T. Ludwig-USA TODAY Sports

When news broke last week of a long-term contract extension for Buffalo Bills quarterback Tyrod Taylor, it appeared on the surface to be a very team-friendly contract for the most important position in sports. With full details of the contract now available, these initial conclusions were entirely correct. Despite a potential value of $93 million dollars, the Tyrod Taylor extension is an extremely team-friendly contract.

It first needs to be stated that this is really only a one-year contract, with a team option for the next five years. If Taylor meets reasonable playtime incentives, he will receive $10.5 million in 2016, via a $3.5 million roster bonus just paid, a $3.4 million signing bonus, and salary plus incentives totaling $3.5 million. Taylor's 2016 salary cap hit will rise from $3 million to $7.913 million.

If the team chooses not to exercise their option bonus and cuts him before the third day of the 2017 league year -€” that is all that Taylor will receive from the Bills and he will become a free agent entering the 2017 season. In this scenario, the Bills would absorb about $2.85 million in 2017 dead money from the combination of acceleration on his new contract signing bonus and the old dead money from the previous deal. If Taylor suffered a career-ending injury, the injury guaranteed money in the contract is $37 million (presumably the $9.5 million in 2016 and the $27.5 million in 2017).

But it's optimism season, and let's assume Taylor plays his way to the 2017 option bonus and presumably a few more years as the starting quarterback in Buffalo. In that scenario, Taylor would receive an additional $27.5 million in 2017. Under that assumption, we can take a look at the yearly cash and cap breakdowns of the contract as well as the potential dead money in the event the Bills cut Taylor at a later date.

Yearly Cash Breakdown

Cash

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

2021

Age

27

28

29

30

31

32

Signing Bonus

$3.4 million

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Roster/ Option Bonus

$3.5 million (roster)

$15.5 million (option)

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Salary

$3.6 million

$12 million

$13 million

$13 million

$14 million

$15 million

Annual Cash Pay

$10.5 million

$27.5 million

$13 million (fully gteed if picked up)

$13 million

$14 million

$15 million

Cumulative Cash Pay

$10.5 million

$38 million

$51 million

$64 million

$78 million

$93 million

Potential Dead Money

$9.77 million

$18.35 million

$27.44 million

$10.66 million

$6.88 million

$3.1 million

Yearly Cap Hit Breakdown

Cap

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

2021

Age

27

28

29

30

31

32

Signing  Bonus Proration

$813,333 ($133k from old deal)

$813,334 ($133k from old deal)

$680,000

$680,000

$680,000

N/A

Option Bonus Proration

N/A

$3.1 million

$3.1 million

$3.1 million

$3.1 million

$3.1 million

Roster Bonus

$3.5 million

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Salary

$3.6 million

$12 million

$13 million (fully gteed if picked up)

$13 million

$14 million

$15 million

Annual Cap Hit

$7.913 million

$15.913 million

$16.78 million

$16.78 million

$17.78 million

$18.1 million

Potential Dead Money

$9.77 million

$18.35 million

$27.44 million

$10.66 million

$6.88 million

$3.1 million

With a contract-high cap hit of $18.1 million in 2021 (a number that would rank 15th in QB cap hits in 2016), this contract will never serve to dominate the Bills salary-cap space. If Taylor improves on his above-average 2015 play, it is very likely that the contract will be renegotiated following the 2018 season, when all of the guaranteed money is gone and Taylor's future potential earnings will be well below the market rate for capable quarterback play.